Indiana Superintendent of Public Instruction

Starting next month teachers will need to spend time focused on career awareness in order to renew their licenses. More than 22,700 – about a third of all teachers in the state – have started the process to renew their licenses compared to just 514 at this time last year.

The Indiana Department of Education says Indiana’s teacher shortage is counterproductive to its priorities.

Youth Summit Addresses Substance Abuse Prevention

Apr 17, 2019

Dozens of Indiana students attended a substance abuse prevention summit at the Statehouse. The event highlighted the expansion of one program to reduce prescription drug abuse. 

While lawmakers in the Senate decided the fate of several bills Tuesday, a group of public education advocates wearing red gathered downstairs. Teachers unions, the Coalition for Public Education and Indiana PTA helped organize the event as a near-final push for more money in the state budget as the legislative session winds down.

Lawmakers in the Senate gave final approval on a bill Tuesday to make Indiana’s next schools chief an appointed one. Now the bill heads to Gov. Eric Holcomb’s desk for his signature.

Appointed Superintendent Bill Heads To Governor

Apr 18, 2017

 

The House advanced a bill to the governor Tuesday to make the Superintendent of Public Instruction an appointed, rather than elected position.

The bill as it originally left the House made the state schools superintendent an appointed position beginning in 2021.

Legislation making the state schools superintendent an appointed position is in limbo as the House weighs its options.

A Senate committee approved a controversial bill Monday that would change the Superintendent of Public Instruction from an elected position to an appointed one.

During this General Assembly, both the House and Senate sponsored bills to make the state’s education chief an appointed position. The House passed its version of the bill, but the Senate, in a surprise move the first half of session, voted theirs down.

Indiana schools stand to lose about $56 million for teacher training and after school programs for low-income students, under proposed budget cuts by President Donald Trump’s administration.

Jennifer McCormick, Indiana superintendent of public instruction, says the proposed budget would be “a big hit” to the state. She says cuts would hamper efforts to attract teachers, stifle new programs under a new federal education law and reduce programs for low-income students.

This week marked the last committee meetings of the first half of the session, as both chambers scramble to wrap up any bills they want to move forward into the second half of the session. Monday and Tuesday are the last days both chambers can approve a bill if they want it to move forward. The legislature will then take the rest of the week off and return the following Monday.

Appointed State Superintendent Gets Surprising Vote

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