Indiana Supreme Court

The Indiana Supreme Court could add another reason – to a limited list – for why employees can’t be fired.

The justices considered that issue at a court hearing Thursday.

The passage rate for the state’s bar exam continues to struggle, with only about 60 percent of prospective attorneys making the grade.

A recent study shows state Supreme Courts across the country lack gender and racial diversity – and Indiana is no exception. All but three of the 110 justices in Hoosier State history have been white men.

Indiana Public Broadcasting Statehouse reporter Brandon Smith talks with Chief Justice Loretta Rush – the state’s first female chief justice – about the issue.

Loretta Rush Reappointed As Indiana Chief Justice

Aug 21, 2019

Loretta Rush will continue to serve as Chief Justice of the Indiana Supreme Court for another five years.

State supreme courts across the country are far less diverse than their states’ populations – Indiana's included.

A new study from the Brennan Center For Justice looked at diversity on states’ highest judicial bodies.

One of the Clark County judges shot in an Indianapolis White Castle parking lot now faces seven criminal charges. Judge Andrew Adams faces disorderly conduct and six counts of battery, two of which are felony charges that could carry six months to two and a half years of jail.

The shooting suspects, Brandon Kaiser and Alfredo Vazquez, also face charges of battery and disorderly conduct. If found guilty, Kaiser could face up to 16 years and Vazquez up to two and a half.

Marion County Prosecutor Terry Curry says he anticipates the three will turn themselves in next week.

A decade-long legal battle between the state and tech giant IBM is nearing its conclusion.

The Indiana Statehouse (Lauren Chapman/IPB News)
Brandon Smith

The Indiana House rejected an attempt Monday to raise the cap on rental fees cities can charge to landlords.

Attorney General Curtis Hill’s initial response to a disciplinary complaint claims the Indiana Supreme Court doesn’t have grounds to punish him. (FILE PHOTO: Lauren Chapman/IPB News)
Brandon Smith

Attorney General Curtis Hill’s initial response to a disciplinary complaint claims the Indiana Supreme Court doesn’t have grounds to punish him.

The Indiana Supreme Court Disciplinary Commission Tuesday filed a complaint against Attorney General Curtis Hill in response to the accusations he groped four women last March.

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