Indiana Supreme Court

Presidencia de la República Mexicana / https://www.flickr.com/photos/presidenciamx/

The Indiana Supreme Court has declined to take up a case that questioned whether an uninsured Fort Wayne man was entitled to information about hospital rates for other, insured patients.

In 2013, uninsured Goshen resident Thomas Frost stayed at Parkview Hospital in Fort Wayne for weeks after being seriously injured in a 2013 motorcycle accident. After Frost was discharged, Parkview said he owed nearly $630 thousand in hospital fees.

Parkview Hospital / http://www.parkview.com/en/locations/Parkview-Regional-Medical-Center/Pages/default.aspx

The Indiana Supreme Court is weighing arguments over whether a hospital has to turn over a list of discounted rates it gives insured patients. 

Thomas Frost was a patient at Parkview Hospital in Fort Wayne for months following a motorcycle accident. He was uninsured and his bill from Parkview was ultimately more than $600 thousand.

ecos systems / https://www.flickr.com/photos/ecossystems/15915563685

Indiana’s Supreme Court justices will weigh whether an Indianapolis police officer can sue over what he calls the gun store’s “unlawful actions.”

Indianapolis police officer Dwayne Runnels was shot with a handgun he alleges was purchased at the store KS&E Sports through what’s called a “straw sale.”

The shooter couldn’t legally buy a gun because he was a convicted felon. So another man bought it instead and sold it to the shooter.

Arthur LeBon / https://www.flickr.com/photos/arthur_lebon/21028418400

The Indiana Supreme Court will hear arguments in a case concerning whether private university police departments must comply with public records laws.

The lawsuit came after the University of Notre Dame Security Police refused to hand over records for an ESPN report examining how campus police interact with student athletes.

ESPN took the university to court, arguing that although it’s a private institution, Notre Dame’s police department is a public entity authorized by the state.

Christian Schnettelker / https://www.flickr.com/photos/manoftaste-de/

Citizen advocacy groups want the Indiana Supreme Court to reconsider its ruling in a case involving the House Republican caucus and the state’s public records law.

The groups filed a lawsuit last years to gain access to emails between a House Republican lawmaker and utility companies.

State Asks To Pull Judge Off IBM Case

May 11, 2016

The state is asking for a new judge in its case against IBM – the company charged with overseeing the technological overhaul of the state welfare system.

 

That's after the initial judge, David Dreyer of the Marion County Superior Court, ruled last week that the state hadn't proved IBM owed anything.

 

Dreyer was also the first judge to handle the case -- in 2012, when he ruled the company had not breached its contract to privatize and modernize Indiana's welfare system under Gov. Mitch Daniels.

Drew Daudelin / Indiana Public Broadcasting

Governor Mike Pence announced Monday that Indianapolis attorney Geoffrey Slaughter will be appointed as the new Supreme Court Justice.

Slaughter worked as special counsel to the Attorney General of Indiana from 1995 to 2001.

Announcing his choice for the Supreme Court Justice appointment, Governor Mike Pence said he received a hand-written note from former Justice Randall Shepard praising Slaughter.

Annie Ropeik/Indiana Public Broadcasting

 

A property rights battle over public access to Indiana's Lake Michigan shore is moving forward with a new issue in the mix -- erosion.

Patricia Sharkey's home in the LaPorte County town of Long Beach is about a block away from a stretch of huge lakefront summer houses. In 2013, homeowners there sued the state, contending their private property extends all the way to the water.

shipwrecklog.com / https://www.flickr.com/photos/wreckphotos/

The Indiana Supreme Court went back to its roots Wednesday, holding an oral argument in the state’s original Supreme Court courtroom in Corydon.

The Supreme Court holds oral arguments around the state every year so people can see the state’s high court in their local communities. But Chief Justice Loretta Rush says the trip to the original Supreme Court courtroom in Corydon – the state’s first capitol – presented unique challenges.

Noah Coffey / https://www.flickr.com/photos/noahwesley/

The Indiana Supreme Court Tuesday ruled it will not force Indiana lawmakers to release their emails under the state’s public records law.  The Court says to do so would violate the state constitution’s separation of powers.

Citizen advocacy groups, including the Citizens Action Coalition, filed a lawsuit to gain access to emails between a House Republican legislator and utility companies. The state’s public records law exempts what’s called “legislative work product,” but doesn’t define what that means. 

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