Indiana Youth Institute

Report: Indiana Improved Kids Health Ranking

Jun 17, 2019

The well-being of Hoosier children ranks in the middle of the pack, according to the Kids Count Data Book.

The annual report finds Indiana in the 29th spot overall, a slight decline from last year.  The data measures trends in well-being, including health, economics and family and community. 

Annual Data Book Outlines Hoosier Youth Wellbeing

Feb 20, 2019

The 25th annual Indiana Kids Count Data Book was presented at the Statehouse Tuesday. The book gives lawmakers, agencies and other community groups a look at how Indiana youth fare. 

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Photo by Gerd Altmann IS LICENSED UNDER CC 0. https://pixabay.com/en/yes-importance-clear-clarity-3029367/

The eighth graders who dashed around the classroom sounded like parrots in a pet store. The students asked each other the same question over and over.

A small group of youth workers in the state had the opportunity to learn more about how to help these children whose emotional and mental wellbeing is often impacted.

One in 10 Indiana children have a parent who is incarcerated. That’s one of the highest rates in the nation.

An annual conference for Indiana youth workers was held in Indianapolis this week. It’s the largest gathering for these workers in the Midwest with over 1,300 attendees this year.

The Indiana Youth Institute has hosted The Because KIDS COUNT Conference for 16 years. CEO Tami Silverman says it’s a chance for Hoosiers who work with children in many settings including schools, foster care, after school or crisis centers to come together.

The Indiana Youth Institute released its annual Kids Count data book Monday. The report measures children’s well-being in five categories: family, economics, education, health and safety.

It highlights the well-being of children in preschool through college – and finds a mixed bag. Overall, it finds, Indiana’s children are “surviving, not thriving.”

We took a dive into how Indiana’s students and school systems measure up.

Major takeaways:

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According to a recent report released by the Indiana Department of Child Services, the majority of fatalities due to child abuse or neglect occur in babies and toddlers.

Of the 66 fatalities that occurred in 2014—the most recent year in which data is available—60 percent occurred in children three years old or younger.

DCS spokesman James Wide says the youngest children are the most vulnerable.

“If we’re not actively supervising these children then they will get into things that will hurt them,” he says.

Kids Count Data Center / http://datacenter.kidscount.org/publications

MENTAL HEALTH  

The Indiana Youth Institute’s annual Kids Count Data Book is out Monday and much of the information focuses on the health of Hoosier kids.

In Indiana, five percent of kids have been diagnosed with serious behavioral problems, four percent with anxiety and three percent with depression. All those rates are higher than the national average.

Study: Number Of Hoosier Kids In Poverty Increasing

Jul 21, 2015
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It’s a mixed bag in terms of economic well-being for Indiana’s children. The Hoosier State worsened in two of four areas in the Annie E. Casey Foundation's 2015 KIDS Count report.

In 2013, 30-percent of Hoosier kids’ parents lacked secure employment, compared to 28-percent in 2008. That’s despite the state’s unemployment rate dropping to pre-recession levels.

velkr0 / https://www.flickr.com/photos/velkr0/

The Indiana Youth Institute wants to help school counselors focus more on non-traditional postsecondary routes – essentially, options beyond a four-year college. That’s one of the goals of the Institute’s counseling conference being held this week.

Indiana Youth Institute Program Director Kate Coffman says universities don’t need much help pitching the traditional four-year route…and that’s why she says the Institute wants to help counselors promote alternatives, such as apprenticeships, the military, and industry certifications.

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