Infrastructure

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

Montgomery County is searching for ways to improve travel and roadways, and Crawfordsville is at the center of that discussion. Intercity train travel took a hit late last month with the loss of the Hoosier State Line. So how is Crawfordsville working to improve transportation and travel for residents?

Courtesy: Montgomery County

A meeting to discuss an addition to the Montgomery County Comprehensive Plan was disrupted Monday night due to questions of transparency. The addition would cover road and infrastructure development.

Montgomery County officials and HWC Engineering scheduled the Monday meeting to gather public input.

Holcomb Officially Launches 2020 Re-election Campaign

Jul 15, 2019

Gov. Eric Holcomb leaned heavily into basketball references as he launched his re-election bid Saturday at the Hoosier Gym, where the movie "Hoosiers" filmed.

Julia Zuchkov / Department of Development

 

Electric scooters will make a return to Greater Lafayette come late June, but with greater restrictions on where they can be parked and driven, as well as how many there will be.

Scooter companies Spin and Gotcha -- based in San Francisco and South Carolina -- have been approved to bring in their own scooters in the wake of Bird scooters flying the coop. City leaders and many citizens complained Bird had flooded the market late last year and West Lafayette economic development aide Julia Zuchkov says the city doesn’t want to be overwhelmed again.

The first stop in our series on the Ports of Indiana was Burns Harbor, an international maritime facility in the heart of steel country. Four hours down Interstate 65, the Port of Jeffersonville is less a port and more a manufacturing hub that happens to be on the Ohio River.

For the next part of our series, Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Annie Ropeik reports Jeffersonville is pushing ahead with expansions to cement its place in the Midwest industrial corridor.

Indiana’s ports move millions of tons each year of the stuff that’s made and used at Midwest factories, including steel, grains and coal. The three ports – one on Lake Michigan and two on the Ohio River – connect Indiana to the national and global economies, and each has to find its own ways to keep up with change.

For the first part of a three-part series, we visited the Port of Indiana-Burns Harbor to see how it’s secured its place in the steel industry.

Indiana has agreed to buy Ohio River-front land in Lawrenceburg that could house the state’s fourth port.

The state has been considering using the 725 acres in southeast Indiana as its next port facility for nearly a year.

Now, it’s inked an agreement to purchase the site, pending further study. Gov. Eric Holcomb’s office says the agreement will let port officials “begin studies to examine the economic and environmental viability of the parcel.”

Indiana’s three ports had their second-best start to the year ever in 2017.

Burns Harbor, Mt. Vernon and Jeffersonville moved 19 percent more cargo in the first six months of this year than at the same time in 2016 – 5.7 million tons overall.

Almost two-thirds of that went through the southwest port of Mt. Vernon, in the form of bulk cargoes – things like coal, ethanol, fertilizer and minerals, which get transferred between railcars, river barges and trucks.

Indiana closed its fiscal year – which ended on June 30th – with a budget surplus of $42 million.

The state also closed with a reserve of $1.77 billion. That’s about $400 million less than the year before.

Office of Management and Budget Director Micah Vincent says the decline was caused by the state’s new long-term road funding plan.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

When, earlier this week, a train derailed in downtown Crawfordsville, it brought to a head some of the concerns Mayor Todd Barton has lodged with the railroads that crisscross his city.

Sure, the tracks caused regular traffic jams before, and city leaders have long hoped for a railroad relocation project, but was this week’s incident the locomotive that broke the camel’s back?

We talk about that incident on this week’s Ask The Mayor program.

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