Karen Tallian

Indiana Republicans opposed the passage and implementation of the Affordable Care Act, including their refusal to create a state-run insurance marketplace.  Now, an impending Supreme Court decision could leave thousands of Hoosiers without subsidies to help pay for that health care.  And partisan differences are once again shaping the debate on how to respond if the state loses those subsidies.

When IU School of Social Work Professor Heather McCabe found out Indiana would not create a state-run exchange under the Affordable Care Act, she was surprised.

Dave Crooks / Facebook

The private worries of many Indiana Democrats about the 2016 governor’s race are beginning to become public.

For weeks, party insiders have worried on social media and in whispers to confidants that the party doesn’t have a good enough candidate to win the state’s top office next year.

Now, former state lawmaker and congressional candidate Dave Crooks says the latest entrant into the race should bow out.

Crooks says he thinks Superintendent of Public Instruction Glenda Ritz is too liberal to win next year’s gubernatorial contest.

Rachel Morello / http://www.ipbs.org/

Education became a much bigger part of the 2016 race for Indiana governor Thursday as State Superintendent Glenda Ritz is throwing her hat into the ring.

The announcement has excited many of those who supported Ritz in her 2012 run for the state’s schools chief  – but others say the former librarian and first-term executive official is stepping outside her wheelhouse.

StateImpact Indiana’s Rachel Morello spoke with Indiana statehouse reporter Brandon Smith about how the lifelong educator can translate her experience into a campaign.

Elle Moxley / indianapublicmedia.org/stateimpact

State superintendent Glenda Ritz announced at the end of this year’s legislative session she might consider a run for governor.

It’s looking like that announcement might be coming soon.

After a legislative session full of education bills, including a bill that originally aimed to remove Ritz from her role as chair of the State Board of Education, Ritz expressed frustration with Governor Pence and said she might run for his office to make the education changes she wants.

Gretchen Frazee / indianapublicmedia.org/news

Portage Senator Karen Tallian is expected to enter the race for governor this week, giving Democrats a contested primary for the second time in three elections for the office.

Courtesy Eric Turner / http://www.in.gov/legislative/house_republicans/homepages/r32/2085.html

Although other issues have overshadowed them this session, the Indiana legislature entered the 2015 session with two major goals: pass a budget and write new ethics reforms.

Recent ethics scandals at the Statehouse prompted lawmakers this session to strengthen Indiana’s ethics code. 

The bipartisan legislation is the most sweeping ethics package in a decade.

But some critics say the changes don’t go far enough.

Kyle May / https://www.flickr.com/photos/kylemay/

The Senate Wednesday narrowly approved a bill eliminating the state’s common construction wage after senators spent more than three hours over the past two days debating the issue of repealing Indiana’s minimum wage for construction workers on public projects.

Opponents of the bill such as Sen. Karen Tallian (D-Portage) note that the common wage helps support job training programs and ensures public projects are properly built by well-trained, highly paid workers.

Brandon Smith / Indiana Public Broadcasting

Indiana Senate leaders Thursday rolled out their version of the state budget, and there are some differences from their House GOP colleagues in a number of key areas:

HIGHER EDUCATION

In total, higher education spending makes up 12-percent of the Senate’s proposed two-year, $31.5 billion budget.

That’s considerably more than what the House suggested.

Senate Appropriations Chair Luke Kenley (R-Noblesville) acknowledges the increase and says it would move state universities in the right direction.

Energy Efficiency Bill Awaits Gov's Signature

Apr 8, 2015
Richard Rutter / https://www.flickr.com/photos/clagnut/

An energy efficiency plan requested by Governor Pence is on its way to his desk.

The Senate has given final approval to a bill requiring electric utilities to submit conservation plans to the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission every three years.

Senate Utilities Chairman Jim Merritt (R-Indianapolis) says by going through the IURC instead of an outside agency, the plan will be cheaper than the Energize Indiana plan implemented by former Governor Mitch Daniels – a program that was repealed by the legislature last year.

Senate Passes Balanced Budget Amendment

Feb 25, 2015
Noah Coffey / https://www.flickr.com/photos/noahwesley/

The Indiana Senate Tuesday passed a resolution to add a balanced budget amendment to the state’s constitution.  Governor Mike Pence requested the measure in his State of the State address earlier this year.  But lawmakers are divided over the amendment’s necessity.

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