Kosali Simon

Muhraz / Wikimedia Commons

Indiana has announced that it hopes to add a work requirement to its Medicaid program. The changes would increase the program’s overall cost by tens of millions of dollars per year, according to the state’s proposal, and could add new hurdles to maintaining coverage for low-income residents.

A new study is the first to measure access to preventative health care services after the Affordable Care Act, or ACA.

The study looked at low-income adults without children in 30 states, including Indiana, where Medicaid has been expanded. It finds these adults are accessing more preventative care services like immunizations, screenings and mammograms.

Indiana University researcher and professor Kosali Simon co-authored the paper and says prevention is one goal of the ACA.

Andrew Malone / https://www.flickr.com/photos/andrewmalone/2290120626

An Indiana University health policy expert says insurance companies might deal a big blow to Obamacare.

Last week, UnitedHealth Group, the nation's largest health insurer, said it might withdraw from the Affordable Care Act's health exchanges after next year if it was unable to turn around what it calls huge financial losses.

While state and federal exchanges only make up a small percentage of the company's business, United says it will lose $700-million on them this year and next.

IU Expert Says ACA Ruling Is A Win For Indiana

Jun 25, 2015
UW Health / https://www.flickr.com/photos/uwhealth/

The health insurance market in Indiana will remain unchanged after the Supreme Court’s ruling to uphold federal subsidies under the Affordable Care Act.

The 6-to-3 ruling in the King v. Burwell case leaves in place the federal subsidies provided to taxpayers who buy health insurance through the federal healthcare exchange.

Those challenging the law argued the subsidies were designed to go only to those who buy insurance through state-run exchanges.