Lafayette

Emilie Syberg / WBAA

 

A week of protests in Lafayette continued Saturday afternoon as several hundred demonstrators gathered at the Tippecanoe County Courthouse. People came forward to address the crowd from a microphone about protest, police reform, the need to vote -- and holding public officials accountable.

Emilie Syberg / WBAA

 

Late Sunday night in downtown Lafayette, a few small groups were still gathered at the intersection of 3rd and Main Streets, quietly talking and watching the Tippecanoe County Courthouse and surrounding streets. They were piecing together the past few hours.

Grant Vasquez was still holding on to a brightly colored sign. He and his friends described what they experienced as a mostly peaceful evening of protest that turned chaotic. 

“No one’s breaking anything right now,” Vasquez said. “It’s all peaceful right now.”

Emilie Syberg / WBAA

A downtown Lafayette march planned as a peaceful demonstration Sunday night ended when law enforcement began releasing tear gas into the crowd. The first canister was dropped from the balcony of the Tippecanoe County Courthouse. 

 

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, local restaurants, salons, and other businesses that serve the public are officially starting to re-open under specific state guidelines. Are business owners, and the people they serve, prepared for safely sharing space – and how are local officials handling the enforcement of issues that might arise? 

Taylor Haggerty / WBAA News

After West Lafayette’s recycling drop-off center closed earlier this year, local officials struggled to find a way to meet demand from residents. The closure coincided with a nationwide upheaval as China stopped accepting materials from the United States.

China’s decision has had far-reaching effects, with major recycling centers closing or halting operation in multiple states.

Despite being a landlocked state that didn’t do much work with China, Indiana has also felt the impact. China’s decision has created a glut in the market – so even if facilities process materials, they may not have any buyers.

Can Lafayette Support A Farm-To-Table Scene?

Feb 17, 2017
Sarah Fentem / WBAA

Within a month of each other, two downtown Lafayette farm-to-table restaurants have announced they’re closing for good.

But experts and chefs alike warn against making too much of the coincidence.

Restauration, a downtown Lafayette restaurant that opened in 2015, was a dream years in the making for owner and chef Kirsten Serrano.  She and her husband, Paco, already had a steady business running La Scala on the courthouse square, but Kirsten wanted to try something new: A farm-to-tale concept that used only local, whole foods and could cater to people with food allergies.

A new report says some Indiana cities could be among the most impacted in the country by a potential trade war.

The Brookings Institution says Columbus is just more than 50 percent dependent on exports – more than any other metro area in the country. Elkhart, Kokomo and Lafayette are also in the top 10.

Local Governments Jump At Road Funding, But How Far Will It Go?

Jun 24, 2016
Lee Coursey / https://www.flickr.com/photos/leeco/

As if there aren’t enough orange construction barrels on Indiana roads, drivers should brace for more.

Repairing roads was the priority this year when state lawmakers voted to return local income tax dollars to cities, towns and counties across the state.

How The Cash Can Be Spent

Seventy-five percent of the money must be spent on roads.

Lawmakers allowed local governments to spend the remaining quarter of the money they’re getting back on a non-road project or to put it away for future use.

Indiana's Oldest Bar Snuffs Out Its Last Cigarette

May 24, 2016
Sarah Fentem / WBAA

People have been drinking—and smoking—inside Lafayette’s Knickerbocker Saloon for almost two centuries. But earlier this spring, the historic bar decided to go smoke-free. However, the transition requires more than posting a “no smoking” sign on the door.

Knickerbocker owner Jeff Hamann says most people just don’t expect or tolerate smoking in public anymore.

And smoking rates have, for the most part, been decreasing in Indiana, dropping 2.5 percent between 2011 and 2014.

Subaru of Indiana Automotive

Subaru is cutting back on production and overtime at its Indiana factory to free up parts for a major recall.

The Japanese car-maker has to fix a steering problem in more than 50,000 new vehicles made recently at its only plant in North America.

The Lafayette factory employs more than 4,000 workers -- and thanks to the recall, as many as 3,000 of them may miss out on daily and Saturday overtime for the next few weeks.

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