lead poisoning

The City of Gary recently received a more than $27,000 grant to help prevent child lead poisoning. Among other things, the city plans to help educate the parents and healthcare providers of kids with elevated blood lead levels.

A new study shows the historical blood lead levels of children in East Chicago’s Superfund site remained higher than those in the rest of the city.

 

East Chicago residents affected by long-term lead exposure from now-shuttered refineries are hoping a new portable lead testing device will give them answers that have so far proved elusive.

Scientists, including a Purdue University professor, are in the process of testing an X-ray gun that measures the amount of lead in people’s bones – and they hope to take that test to East Chicago.

AgnosticPreachersKid / https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:AgnosticPreachersKid

East Chicago residents are taking steps to open a fifth lawsuit over lead and arsenic contamination there.

Residents allege city and state officials knew about the pollution as far back as 1972, when the West Calumet Housing Complex was built.

More than 250 current and former residents, including 187 children, filed notices last week that they intend to sue the city of East Chicago.

Eric Pavlack is one of the attorneys representing the residents.

Most families in a lead-contaminated public housing complex in East Chicago, Indiana will miss their first deadline to find new homes on Oct. 31.

It means they’ll get extensions through the end of the year, but why has it been so hard to find housing?

On a recent rainy day in East Chicago, landlord Clay Brooks drills open a plywood front door on one of a row of vacant houses and ducks inside.

“So this is one that we’re rehabbing,” he says. “As you can see, some things that need to get done. This is a three-bedroom.”

Elkhart Plans Survey Of Lead Water Pipes

Oct 24, 2016
Brandy Shaul / https://www.flickr.com/photos/zoologist/

In the wake of the drinking water crisis in Flint, Michigan, many towns across the country are taking steps to reduce the risk of lead contaminated drinking water—including Elkhart. Elkhart’s first step is identifying those lead service lines.

Elkhart’s Board of Public Works freed up nearly $300,000 for the city’s public works department. Utility Service Manger Laura Kolo says the money will be used to locate all the lead service lines.

Nick Janzen / Indiana Public Broadcasting

Three weeks into what some agencies refer to as “National Preparedness Month,” the Indiana Department of Health has sent out a press release congratulating itself on the state’s response to health crises and reminding Hoosiers to keep themselves safe from public health concerns. But the affirmation comes at a strange time -- during a public health crisis in East Chicago.

Annie Ropeik / Indiana Public Broadcasting

 

The West Calumet neighborhood in East Chicago, Ind. is a federally designated clean-up site — a Superfund. Its soil contains lead and arsenic at levels that, residents recently learned, are much worse than expected.

Now, hundreds of families have been told to find new homes by November. But many residents — and their lawyers — say they can't move that fast without more help.

East Chicago School Receives Disaster Relief Loan

Sep 15, 2016
Claire McInerny

State officials have loaned the school district $3 million to support its response to the ongoing lead contamination crisis.

East Chicago’s Carrie Gosch elementary school sits next to soil that contains staggering levels of lead. That’s a major health threat that can harm children’s brain development.

So, as a safety measure, district officials moved about 450 elementary students to an abandoned middle school across – and rushed to renovate it before school began.

courtesy Sierra Club

Seven environmental health and justice organizations, including the Sierra Club, are suing the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency over what they say are outdated toxicity standards for lead.  

The suit comes as authorities explore just how contaminated the heavy metal has made the soil in East Chicago.

Thinkprogress.org health writer Alex Zelinski says the lawsuit claims the EPA – and not the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- should have kept more accurate records on the alarming rise of health effects of lead on humans. 

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