mental health

A Health Blog / https://www.flickr.com/photos/healthblog/

A new study from the nonprofit Mental Health America puts Indiana 45th in the nation when it comes to mental health care.

The survey gauges achievement in 15 different metrics, including the percentage of adults and children who report mental illness, the number of adults with dependence or abuse of drugs or alcohol and number of adults with a disability who can’t afford to see a doctor.

District 26 Candidates Debate Schools, Mental Health

Sep 23, 2016
Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

One of the biggest issues in this year’s race for the Indiana House of Representatives District 26 seat may be how to improve the state’s education system.

In the first debate of the race Thursday, Democratic candidate Vicky Woeste said the state needs to reject what she calls the ALEC-driven education agenda, referring to the conservative group which drafts right-leaning legislation for statehouses across the country.

Woeste says she wants to restore public school funding, noting the West Lafayette School Corporation has asked for referendum funding due to cuts.

Indiana University

Latino teens demonstrate higher levels of stress, depression and suicidal thoughts than any other school-age demographic in the state.

Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Jill Sheridan reports on one Indiana summer camp that aims to address this problem.  

Michael Coghlan / https://www.flickr.com/photos/mikecogh/

Indiana has the second-highest percentage in the nation of children who have a parent who’s been incarcerated. A new study shows this can have long lasting effects on a child’s wellness.

According to the National Survey of Children’s Health, 11-percent of Hoosier children have a parent who has been incarcerated.  A new report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation highlights the impact that time behind bars has on children.

Associate Professor at IU School of Medicine and Riley Hospital for Children Pediatric Dr. Matthew Aalsma, says the report is a valuable tool.

Jill Sheridan

As the discussion about Hoosiers facing mental health issues evolves, one problem frequently mentioned is a lack of support systems.  

Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Jill Sheridan reports on one of these support systems, Clubhouse, a rehabilitation center that is working to reestablish state Medicaid funding.

Kids Count Data Center / http://datacenter.kidscount.org/publications

MENTAL HEALTH  

The Indiana Youth Institute’s annual Kids Count Data Book is out Monday and much of the information focuses on the health of Hoosier kids.

In Indiana, five percent of kids have been diagnosed with serious behavioral problems, four percent with anxiety and three percent with depression. All those rates are higher than the national average.

Pence Announces New State Mental Health Hospital

Dec 16, 2015
courtesy photo

Governor Mike Pence announced Wednesday plans for a new $120 million mental health hospital on the east side of Indianapolis. 

The state is partnering with Community Health Network to develop a neuro-diagnostic institute, which will have 159 beds and the capacity to treat 1,500 patients per year.

Pence emphasizes that along with confronting mental illness, the facility was created to fight the state’s ongoing drug addiction crisis.

Pence also notes that of the 30 thousand people incarcerated in Indiana, nearly half have a mental illness or substance abuse disorder.

Col. Frederic A. Drummond Jr., Chicago District commander, speaks to Sen. Joe Donnelly during a Congressional Staff tour at Brandon Road Lock and Dam, Joliet, Ill., April 22, 2014.
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Chicago District / https://www.flickr.com/photos/usacechicago/

U.S. Senator Joe Donnelly says his latest effort on military suicide prevention aims to help servicemembers and veterans connect with mental health providers in their communities.  That follows up on Donnelly’s 2014 legislation that allowed all military members to receive annual mental health screenings.

Senator Joe Donnelly says his latest package of bills, recently signed into law, helps servicemembers find mental health providers attuned to their specific needs.  Donnelly says one way is to expand training beyond traditional mental health providers.

http://www.donnelly.senate.gov/about/joe

A bill to expand mental healthcare for veterans has cleared a first hurdle in the Senate, but Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-IN) says there are multiple ways he can try to write the provisions into law.

The Armed Services Committee sent the mental-health bill to the floor last week as part of a national defense bill. But Donnelly says he'll also work through the Veterans Affairs Committee to add coverage for veterans as well.

Crisis Intervention Training Bill Passes House

Apr 7, 2015
Steve Baker / https://www.flickr.com/photos/littlebiglens

  Law enforcement crisis training is closer to becoming a statewide requirement now that the House has passed a bill advising more funding for it.

Sen. Mark Stoops (D-Bloomington) says there isn’t currently enough training teaching police how to handle a crisis, such as a mental health issue or a diabetic attack. Stoops says the bill would make law enforcement communication safer and more effective.

“Treatment typically costs about a dollar for every six dollars we would’ve spent on incarceration. So it’s a very cost-effective approach as well,” Stoops says.

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