mental health

Col. Frederic A. Drummond Jr., Chicago District commander, speaks to Sen. Joe Donnelly during a Congressional Staff tour at Brandon Road Lock and Dam, Joliet, Ill., April 22, 2014.
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Chicago District / https://www.flickr.com/photos/usacechicago/

U.S. Senator Joe Donnelly says his latest effort on military suicide prevention aims to help servicemembers and veterans connect with mental health providers in their communities.  That follows up on Donnelly’s 2014 legislation that allowed all military members to receive annual mental health screenings.

Senator Joe Donnelly says his latest package of bills, recently signed into law, helps servicemembers find mental health providers attuned to their specific needs.  Donnelly says one way is to expand training beyond traditional mental health providers.

http://www.donnelly.senate.gov/about/joe

A bill to expand mental healthcare for veterans has cleared a first hurdle in the Senate, but Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-IN) says there are multiple ways he can try to write the provisions into law.

The Armed Services Committee sent the mental-health bill to the floor last week as part of a national defense bill. But Donnelly says he'll also work through the Veterans Affairs Committee to add coverage for veterans as well.

Crisis Intervention Training Bill Passes House

Apr 7, 2015
Steve Baker / https://www.flickr.com/photos/littlebiglens

  Law enforcement crisis training is closer to becoming a statewide requirement now that the House has passed a bill advising more funding for it.

Sen. Mark Stoops (D-Bloomington) says there isn’t currently enough training teaching police how to handle a crisis, such as a mental health issue or a diabetic attack. Stoops says the bill would make law enforcement communication safer and more effective.

“Treatment typically costs about a dollar for every six dollars we would’ve spent on incarceration. So it’s a very cost-effective approach as well,” Stoops says.

Skiddie2003/Wikimedia

While Indiana is ahead of the curve when it comes to juvenile justice reform, a new study in the American Journal of Public Health indicates there remains room for improvement.

As part of the study, the stays of more than 25,000 juveniles were examined. Indiana is one of only two states that have implemented mental health screenings in juvenile detention centers.

Brandon Smith / Indiana Public Broadcasting

Crisis Intervention Teams, known as CIT programs, exist in several cities, including Fort Wayne and Indianapolis.  CIT officers are trained to identify the mentally ill and help determine the best way to deal with them – which often includes transporting them to a hospital, instead of jail.

Fort Wayne police officer Tony Maze is the head of the traffic division and a CIT member.  He says Fort Wayne CIT officers are specifically trained not to arrest people for minor crimes if the officers believe the offender has a mental illness.

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