Michael Hicks

No cases of the new coronavirus have been confirmed in Indiana. But some businesses in the state are having to navigate potential parts shortages due to the virus’s impact in China.

Ball State University’s economist says Indiana should focus much more energy and money into educating Hoosier students, so the state “isn’t left back a generation.”  As IPR’s Stephanie Wiechmann reports, he says that doesn’t mean preparing a workforce of manufacturers.

 

“I don’t think the state is doing even a minimally adequate job of coming to grips with the fact that manufacturing employment in Indiana is not going to grow.”

Indiana health care prices are much higher than in many other states and a new analysis points to even higher prices in some areas. 

An Indiana economist says the United Automobile Workers strike against General Motors comes at a pivotal moment for the union. 

The 2019 Manufacturing Scorecard puts Indiana among the top five states for manufacturing and logistics. Indiana continues to show success in areas including global reach and tax climate where other states are struggling.

U.S. Steel announced Friday the company will idle its East Chicago Tin mill where an estimated 150 workers could face layoffs.

Indiana business, faith and law enforcement leaders gathered Wednesday evening in Indianapolis for the "Leading the Way on Immigration: Indiana" forum to discuss immigration in the Hoosier state.

Indiana school districts with 2,000 or fewer students lag behind academically as compared to larger corporations, according to a study commissioned by the Indiana Chamber and released Tuesday.

The report, conducted by researchers at Ball State University, found that the enrollment size of a school corporation correlates with student test scores and access to college prep courses.

Annie Ropeik

A Ball State University economic forecast says the United States has fully recovered from the Great Recession and growth is coming.  The annual prediction also shows slow growth in Indiana, especially in the state’s manufacturing sector.

Ball State economist Michael Hicks predicts the national economy will grow by 2.1 percent next year.  Compared to other national forecasts, that’s conservative – some predict up to 2.4 percent growth.

Jason Kuffer / https://www.flickr.com/photos/digiart2001/3197813348

A Ball State University economist predicts the U.S. economy will grow about 2.2-percent next year. 

The annual forecast is lower than in previous years, but this year’s predictions take into account the inherent trouble with forecasts.

Last year, Ball State economist Michael Hicks predicted the U.S. would grow its gross domestic product – or GDP – by around 2.7-percent.  So did many others. 

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