Nick Schenkel Book Reviews

Book Review: Movie Guides

Nov 1, 2019

We have all had the moment in our lives where we cannot decide on what movie to watch. If you are the type to be browsing the internet all night looking at movie reviews, perhaps consider one of these film books. Leonard Maltin's Classic Movie Guide and New Kings of the World: Dispatches from Bollywood, Dizi and K-Pop are two very different, but knowledgable, movie guides. So grab your popcorn as West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has the review.

Book Review: Proof!

Oct 25, 2019

You may remember the days of taking geometry in high school. You may have even considered the discipline as "useless" while in fury at your hard homework. Proof! by Amir Alexander gives readers the historical proof that geometry matters more than we think. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has the review.

Book Review: A Beginner's Guide to Japan

Oct 18, 2019

You walk into a room and flip the light switch down to turn the lights on. Each member of your family has a different street address despite you all living in the same home. What kind of crazy place is this? A Beginner's Guide to Japan shows these are just a few of the peculiarities of this fascinating country. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has the review.

Book Review: The Ultimate Tool Book

Oct 11, 2019

Are you the type to install your own cabinets, build furniture, and considered the "handyman?" If so, this book may be a necessary addition to the bookshelf you made. The Ultimate Tool Book: Every Tool You Need to Own, written by the Popular Mechanics magazine, is an in-depth analysis of tools you may have never thought to use. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has the review.

Book Review: Tapestry

Oct 4, 2019

A huntsmen stumbles upon a mute girl lost in the woods and unfamiliar with her past. After taking her in, they slowly put together the fragments of the former life she has forgotten. The first of an epic fantasy series, this is the story of  Tapestry: Strands of Yellow and Blue by Cady Elizabeth Arnold. West Lafayette Library Director Nick Schenkel has the review.

It all started with a mistake. The earliest known human, Lucy, fell from a tree and died. It doesn't get much better from there in Humans: A Brief History of How We F***ed It All Up by Tom Phillips. This comedically thought provoking book looks at the messy mistakes caused by our human nature. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has the review.

Book Review: Agrippina

Sep 20, 2019

In the limited amount of ancient history we have, many women have been swept under the rug. It's difficult for historians to really know much about ancient women, as little could be written about them. In the book Agrippina: The Most Extraordinary Woman of the Roman World, author Emma Southon  looks at one of the few Ancient Roman women that was written about. A mother of an emperor and eventual empress, Southen argues that historians may have it wrong about Agrippina. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has the review.

Book Review: Middle-Earth

Sep 13, 2019

What mythical beings eat six meals a day, live in underground homes, and are about two or four feet tall? If you instantly knew the answer was Hobbits then the coffee book Middle Earth: Journeys in Myth and Legend by Donato Giancola may be the perfect read for you. West Lafayette Public Library Director Nick Schenkel has the review.

Book Review: Rolling in Dough

Sep 6, 2019

Would you ever leave a safe, well-paying job and risk everything to start a doughnut shop with your family? That’s what Purdue Professor Glen Sparks’ family did as is told in his memoir Rolling in Dough. A family-run small business making doughnuts sounds like the American dream, but, as Sparks tells us, every business has its costs. West Lafayette Library Director Nick Schenkel has the review.

Book Review: The Taiga Syndrome

Aug 30, 2019

Not many books can say they are of the "Metaphysical, existential, fairy-tale inspired, detective-mystery genre," however The Taiga Syndrome by Cristina Rivera Garza is one of those books. Filled with fascinating, philosophical curiosities and events that blur the line between fantasy and reality, this is a book unlike any other. West Lafayette Library Director Nick Schenkel has the review.

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