painkillers

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The Indiana attorney general is putting a “surge” of heroin and opioid antidote into the field in order to combat a rising number of overdose deaths. The A-G announced $127 thousand in grants to three organizations Thursday to buy more Naloxone kits and train first responders on how to use them.

Attorney General Greg Zoeller calls this a “triage” phase of reducing opioid addiction. The first part, he says, is cracking down on the oversupply of strong painkillers.

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The American Cancer Society says Indiana has improved significantly when it comes to pain management policies.  But a report from the Society’s Cancer Action Network says the state still has more to do.

There are only eight states that received less than a B from the Cancer Action Network in its report on pain management and patient care policies.  Indiana moved this year from a C-plus to a B. 

Network Associate Director David Woodmansee says that’s because of a new step taken by the State Medical Board.

A new task force aimed at curbing prescription drug abuse will compile recommendations for the state legislature to act on next session.

Indiana created the Prescription Drug Abuse Task Force with a membership made up of legislators, law enforcement and health officials, pharmaceutical representatives, state and local agencies and educators.  State department of health chief medical officer Joan Duwve, who co-chairs the task force, calls prescription drug abuse an epidemic in the state.