pay raises

Jae Lee / WBAA News

Sometimes news changes fast. When we taped our conversation with Purdue University President Mitch Daniels this month, the school had just announced it’ll change its IDs to make it easier for students to vote in Tippecanoe County. As you’ll hear, Daniels says Purdue isn’t in the elections business, and advises that the state Bureau of Motor Vehicles – which he oversaw as governor – will give free IDs to those who ask.

That’s true, and it’s a fact the county election board seized upon a couple days after the interview was taped. But there’s a problem – getting that ID can mean students would have to give up their driver’s license from their home state.

Jae Lee / WBAA News

It came as little surprise when, earlier this month, Purdue President Mitch Daniels announced the school would extend its tuition freeze another year. The bigger financial news was the offering of a $500 bonus to employees making less than $75,000 a year.

Samantha Horton / IPB News

Attributing it to the tax changes made by congressional Republicans late last year, Walmart handed out bonuses to employees across the country Thursday.

Two bonuses were given out: one being a one-time cash bonus of up to $1,000 and the other a quarterly bonus based on the store's sales performance where the employee is located.

Walmart spokesperson Anne Hatfield says it’s a day for celebration for all employees.

Jae Lee / WBAA News

One of the big themes this year at Purdue University is tracking. The school plans to better track how efficient its business process are. However, implementation of a new human capital management system has already incurred at least a half-year’s worth of delays.

Employees are being asked to track their health more closely, and are being incentivized to exercise by being offered small discounts on health insurance. But how is the school tracking whether people actually go to the gym?

Crawfordsville Wraps Up 2018 Budget Workshops

Jul 25, 2017
https://www.flickr.com/photos/jstephenconn/3051019997
J. Stephen Conn

The city of Crawfordsville completed its final budget workshop Monday night, and despite a 10-percent health insurance premium increase, the mayor says it could have been much worse.

During the meeting, Crawfordsville mayor Todd Barton said at the county level, premiums are going up 20-percent. The city’s employees are also receiving a two-percent salary increase.

The majority of the city’s departments have little to no significant change in their budget for next year, which Barton says is due to planning.

City of Frankfort

Frankfort Mayor Chris McBarnes is on track to get an $8,000 raise next year.

That constitutes a 15-percent increase – compared to the 3-percent pay raise budgeted for most other city employees, as well as the clerk-treasurer and city judge.

Clerk-Treasurer Judy Sheets says, in accordance with federal law, the parks superintendent is set to receive an 8-percent raise.

The Frankfort City Council on Tuesday approved the salary ordinance on second reading. One more vote is required at next month’s council meeting.

Lafayette Elected Officials On Track To Get 5.5% Raises

Oct 5, 2016
Central Indiana Glass & Glazing

The Lafayette City Council Tuesday night passed the first reading of an ordinance that would give the mayor and other elected officials a 5.5-percent raise.

City Controller Mike Jones says Lafayette employees are all on a salary grid and the increase will bring the incomes of elected officials up to par with other personnel.

“[We’re] trying to get everybody caught up and the hope is that as things look better and better in the private sector, that we can entice the good people that we have to stay,” Jones says.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

What happens when a mayor takes on one of the nation’s largest employers over a few hundred yards of road?

That’s the situation Todd Barton finds himself in with Wal-Mart in Crawfordsville.

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we’ll inquire how he plans to resolve the situation without alienating one of his city’s most prominent investors.

Jae Lee / WBAA News

Think of Purdue University for a second like a giant pot of money. Yes, yes, some people already do. But bear with us.

Hypothetically, if the nation sees price inflation of any kind, the consumer price index goes up – and it has the last several years.

Now, if that giant pot of money isn’t being added to with even small tuition increases to keep up with inflation, is there more or less money in the pot to give to employees in the form of raises?

Purdue University

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics says the national inflation rate for 2014 was about 1.6-percent. That means employees who receive raises of 1.6-percent are just keeping pace with an increased cost of living.

So when Purdue proposed a 3-to-3.5-percent raise for many employees, it came as a welcome respite from years of raises in the 0-to-2-percent range. On this month’s conversation with Purdue President Mitch Daniels, we ask him how he arrived at that number and how it’ll be doled out.

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