Politics

Jae Lee / WBAA News

Purdue President Mitch Daniels disagrees with the notion that he’s sometimes snarky in the regular column he writes for the Washington Post. He’d prefer to call it sarcasm or humor. But in a recent column about politics – a subject he regularly comments on, even if there’s little connection to his current role in higher education – his language jabs at both parties, but is notably more dismissive to Democratic ideals.

John Clare

A new program airs Sunday and Tuesday nights on WBAA Classical: What's New. Host John Clare features new music, new releases, and interesting guests. Hear a special preview of this week's What's New, and let us know what you think.


Jae Lee / WBAA News

Mitch Daniels came into the Purdue presidency vowing to stay away from politics as he pursued a job in academic administration.

But when you’re arguably the most popular Republican in a red state, and when conservative columnists regularly call for your return to partisan life, it can be hard to stick to such proclamations.

President Obama rejected an application to build the 1,700-mile Keystone XL pipeline from Canada to the U.S. Gulf Coast on Wednesday. He blamed congressional Republicans, who had set a 60-day deadline for his administration to complete its review of the project.

Just minutes after Obama issued a statement denying the permit, Republican members of Congress lined up before TV cameras.

"I'm deeply, deeply disappointed that our president decided to put his politics above the nation," said Rep. Lee Terry of Nebraska.

In "Reconstituting The Constitution: How To Rewrite It," we invited readers to share their own thoughts on how we might change the founding document for 2011. Now the people have spoken.

IN Gov. Mitch Daniels makes endorsement decision

Nov 29, 2011
courtesy Purdue President's Office

Indiana's governor likely won't be giving public support to any of the Republican candidates for president.

Mitch Daniels says he doesn't plan on making an endorsement before the primaries kick off in five weeks, and indicated he might not make any at all.

He thinks endorsements are overrated, and believes saying who thinks should be the nominee won't have any impact on voters.

Daniels says he is encouraged by statements the GOP field has made recently about spending and entitlement programs.