power plants

Legislation that could have put a moratorium on some new power plants in Indiana was overturned Thursday. The House passed an amendment to remove that language from a bill dealing with various utility matters.

Rep. Ed Soliday (R-Valparaiso) wants a two-year moratorium on new power plants while the legislature and utility regulators help craft a comprehensive energy plan for the state. (Lauren Chapman/IPB News)
Brandon Smith

Republicans in a House committee this week voted to largely halt new power plants in Indiana for the next two years.

The moratorium’s architect says he wants to ensure the state’s energy future is balanced.

The Environmental Protection Agency is reconsidering the reasoning behind its rule that limits air pollutants from coal and oil-fired power plants. An expert says that could lead to the standards’ undoing and more coal pollution in Indiana. 

Alan Berning / https://www.flickr.com/photos/14617207@N00/2621375759

Indiana is once again headed to federal court to block and Environmental Protection Agency regulation. 

Indiana was part of an effort to block the EPA's power plant rule before it became final. The latest lawsuit -- involving Indiana and 23 other states -- takes aim at the regulation now that it's taken effect. 

The EPA rule would require Hoosier state power plants to reduce their carbon emissions between 30 and 38 percent by 2030....a mandate Gov. Mike Pence calls ill-conceived, saying it will be too costly for the state to comply, 

How Indiana Could Achieve The New EPA Pollution Standards

Aug 19, 2015
Alan Berning / https://www.flickr.com/photos/14617207@N00/2621375759

Indiana must reduce the carbon dioxide its power plants emit by about a third in the next 15 years.

The mandate comes as part of new Environmental Protection Agency rules President Obama announced earlier this month.

The rules require each state to put together a plan on how it will reach the new EPA goals. Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Gretchen Frazee explains how that could work.

Alan Berning / https://www.flickr.com/photos/14617207@N00/2621375759

Governor Mike Pence says he will use everything at his disposal to oppose new proposed federal regulations seeking to reduce carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants. 

President Obama announced Monday the Environmental Protection Agency’s proposed regulations seek to reduce carbon emissions 30-percent by the year 2030. 

New regulations issued by the Obama administration will force the country's coal- and oil-fired power plants to reduce the emission of pollutants such as arsenic and mercury or shut down.

In a statement, the Environmental Protection Agency said the new standards "will protect millions of families and children from harmful and costly air pollution and provide the American people with health benefits that far outweigh the costs of compliance."