race

The Indiana Commission on Hispanic and Latino Affairs (ICHLA), a nonpartisan state agency, is holding statewide listening sessions to identify the issues and concerns faced by the Hispanic and Latino communities.

Jae Lee / WBAA News

As we were preparing for this month’s conversation with Purdue President Mitch Daniels, a question came in from a loyal listener. Why, he asked, would Purdue even consider taking the name of Papa John’s Pizza founder John Schnatter off of the business center his $8 million gift to Purdue helped endow, even if Schnatter admits to repeating a racial slur on a conference call with his company’s executives? Wouldn’t that be tantamount to limiting free speech on campus?

Alan Cleaver / https://www.flickr.com/photos/alancleaver/

Indiana came closer than it’s ever come during the last session to joining the ranks of states with bias crime, or hate crime laws. 

Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Brandon Smith frames the debate over the legislation, including the difficult road it faces going forward.

Indiana came closer than it’s ever come during the 2016 legislative session to joining the ranks of states with bias crime, or hate crime, laws. 

Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Brandon Smith frames the debate on the legislation, including the difficult road it faces going forward.

Purdue University

Purdue University President Mitch Daniels has been pondering a number of racially-charged issues in the last month.

He’s of Syrian heritage and has watched as his state has tried to deny refugees fleeing civil war from coming to Indiana.

And his campus was the site of a protest similar to one at the University of Missouri decrying racial disparities at Purdue.

Those are just two topics we cover on November’s Monthly Conversation With Mitch Daniels.

Purdue University

Tyrell Connor spends a lot of time on Purdue’s campus.  He figures between classes and studying he commits about 35-to-40 hours a week in the school’s buildings.

But, for the fourth year PhD student, one facility in particular represents an ongoing struggle for him and other African American students.

Purdue has no shortage of landmarks.

Its clock tower is visually appealing and the sound of its bell can be heard throughout campus.  The Engineering Fountain offers a beautiful backdrop for graduation and family photos and basketball games inside Mackey Arena spark energy into campus

These landmarks represent what Purdue is today.  But, the land they sit on was once home to Native Americans who now make up less than one percent of the student population.

“People don’t relate to that connectedness that already exists,” said Canek Phillips.

Dead Week for Purdue students is the seven days leading up to final exams.  Sleep comes at a premium, bags under their eyes are the latest accessory, and energy drinks are consumed at Nascar speeds.

But, at the Latino Cultural Center, dead week also is a chance for students to gather one last time before the end of the semester.

On December 6th, about 40 students packed inside the LCC. The center provided free meals for them. 

As David Robledo says, it’s just one less thing students have to worry about as they get ready to take their biggest exams of the semester.

If you take a look around the food court at Purdue’s Memorial Union, there is no doubt you will see students’ fingers and thumbs aflutter with their eyes completely locked on their phone screens, tablets, and laptops. 

Social media’s role on campus continues to rise.  Students get election results from there, sports scores and news, and even the heads-up on the next great viral video.

But, sites such as Facebook and Twitter also shed light on some of the darker sides of campus.

Forum aims at enhancing race relations at Purdue

Sep 25, 2012

A group at Purdue is putting together a plan for how to address racism on campus.

The Black Graduate Student Association hosted a race and diversity forum Tuesday on campus.

President Tyrell Connor says the goal was not necessarily to vent frustrations, but come up with ideas for how to resolve the problem.

Purdue investigating racist incident on campus

Sep 21, 2012

Purdue is investigating an incident earlier this week in the Krannert Library.

University police are following up on a racist note that was written on a whiteboard at the library.

Christine Taylor is the Vice Provost for Diversity at Purdue. She says she is saddened the incident, but is not calling it a hate crime. Taylor says while it was racially motivated, no law was broken, so it's classified as a case of "racial bias."

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