recycling

courtesy City of Frankfort

At the beginning of this year, WBAA held a public forum in Frankfort asking residents what amenities they wanted to see in town, and also asking this question: is there a single signature feature around which an identity could be built?

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we ask Chris McBarnes whether he might be able to turn recent difficulties with recycling into an opportunity as the waste disposal industry tries to re-evaluate its future. In a manufacturing-heavy city such as Frankfort, it might make sense.

Taylor Haggerty / WBAA News

Investigators have ruled the cause of a fire that ravaged a Frankfort recycling plant in July as “undetermined.” That’s according to a press release issued by city officials Thursday.

The press release states that, though they could confirm the fire started on the northeast side of the Werner & Son recycling plant, they could not determine what caused the blaze.

Taylor Haggerty / WBAA News

Delphi officials have suspended curbside recycling pickup for residents. The decision is the result of a July fire that destroyed a Frankfort recycling plant.

Delphi Mayor Shane Evans says the curbside pickup is suspended until Werner & Son, the Frankfort recycling plant they previously used, is back on its feet. He says that’s projected to take between six months and a year.

Emilie Syberg / WBAA

The Tippecanoe County Commissioners passed an ordinance Monday fining residents who discard non-recyclable items at the county’s recycling drop-off sites.

Offenders are docked $250 for the first violation, $1,000 for a second violation within one year, and up to $2,500 for a third violation in 12 months.

“We’ve had electronics, water heaters, construction debris, scooters, bicycles, you name it—things have been left there that are just truly not recyclable,” Commissioner Tom Murtaugh says.

Taylor Haggerty / WBAA News

It will be at least a week before officials conclude an investigation into the cause of a fire at a Frankfort recycling plant.

Assistant Fire Chief Ed Cripe says the Frankfort Fire Department has two members investigating, along with a private investigator brought in by Werner and Son Recycling. He says they’re still reviewing video surveillance and conducting interviews.

The city street department is still collecting recycling in place of Werner and Son. They will continue to collect from one quadrant of the city at a time until the regular weekly schedule can resume.

Taylor Haggerty / WBAA News

Frankfort officials have suspended the city’s curbside recycling pickup this week after a Monday fire at a recycling plant, but officials say residents can still drop off materials at the city street department.

Street Superintendent Jason Forsythe says the city began partnering with Werner and Son for its recycling a few years ago, when the amount of materials to be processed became too much for its own facilities.

Taylor Haggerty / WBAA News

A fire at a Frankfort recycling plant continued to burn Monday afternoon as firefighters fought back the blaze.

Teams were dispatched to Werner and Son Recycling around 4:30 Monday morning after a passerby reported what they thought was a dumpster fire. Officials don’t know what caused the blaze, which tore down much of the east side of the building and left only the façade on the west.

'Milkman Model' Economy Could Create Jobs In Indiana

Jun 12, 2019

This year’s Indiana Recycling Coalition Conference focused less on recycling and more on the other two R’s — reduce and reuse. China’s refusal to take the United States’ low-grade recycling is forcing some communities to think about a more holistic approach. 

City of West Lafayette

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, listeners weigh in on the recent closure of West Lafayette’s recycling drop-off site. With less than favorable reviews rolling in for Lafayette’s Ninth Street drop-off location, what new recycling options should these West Lafayette recyclers expect from the city—and when?

Purdue Technology Turns Plastics Into Diesel, Gasoline

Mar 5, 2019

Researchers at Purdue University may have found a way to turn plastic bags, milk jugs, and food containers into fuel. 

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