remote learning

(FILE PHOTO: Tyler Lake/WTIU)

Many of Indiana's school leaders are grappling with tension in their communities as they consider how and when to bring more kids back into schools, but teachers say they're feeling more pressure than ever to manage classes in-person and online, as well as their own safety.

Lauren Chapman / IPB News

More than $61 million in federal funding from the CARES Act is making its way into Indiana schools to support remote learning needs.

(FILE PHOTO: Tyler Lake/WTIU)

Gov. Eric Holcomb is pitching an idea to calm concerns about school funding, but school leaders are doubtful it will truly clear up the problem and say it could make things like navigating teacher pay even more challenging.

(Zach Herndon/IPB News)

Indiana schools will have access to a grant program aimed at improving remote learning. The $61.6 million for the state-run program comes from the federal CARES Act.

The Holcomb administration said the money will be focused on three areas: adding more devices used for remote learning, closing gaps in internet connectivity and helping train teachers in remote instruction.

Lauren Chapman / IPB News

 

Indiana Superintendent of Public Instruction Jennifer McCormick says the local response from school districts to support Indiana’s more than 1 million K-12 students learning from home is taking shape but the disparity in funding is emphasizing inequalities. 

School districts are struggling to provide robust e-learning options to families. A reason some can not, she says, is inadequate state funding. 

Purdue University

 

Purdue University announced Monday May and June graduate and undergraduate summer courses will be conducted remotely, and a decision about in-person July classes will be made by May 15. 

“It is our hope that we are able to offer all courses originally planned for summer in a remote format,” Purdue Provost Jay Akridge wrote in a letter. “Academic progress for all students continues to be a priority.”

Purdue University

 

Purdue President Mitch Daniels says the university is planning for all the ways future life on campus could change as the novel coronavirus outbreak continues to spread. 

“We will be dealing with a different environment, and with different ground rules, even in the circumstance we’re all hoping for -- which is that we do get life re-started again, and fairly soon,” Daniels says.