Right-To-Work

Indiana Becomes a Right-To-Work State

Feb 1, 2012

Indiana is now the 23rd Right-To-Work state in the country.

The Senate signed off on the bill Wednesday just two days after it was approved in the House.

Governor Mitch Daniels put the final stamp on the measure.  He signed it into law Wednesday afternoon.

Bill sponsor Carlin Yoder says despite challenges in getting the bill through, he thinks it’s the right move for the state.

The law prohibits unions and companies from requiring dues from non-members.

The Senate passed the measure by a 28-to-22 vote.  Nine Republicans joined Democrats in opposing it.

IN House Approves Right-To-Work Bill

Jan 26, 2012

Despite five members voting against it, Indiana House Republicans still garnered enough votes to pass Right-To-Work legislation.

The bill passed by a 54-to-44 vote.

It goes to the Senate, where last week members there approved an identical measure, and then is expected to go to Governor Mitch Daniels desk.

His signature would make Indiana the 23rd state in the nation to adopt a bill banning unions and companies from charging dues to non-union members.

Indiana Senate Passes Right-To-Work Legislation

Jan 24, 2012

Indiana is closer to becoming a Right-To-Work state.

The Senate passed a measure that would prohibit unions from charging dues to non-members by a 28-to-22 vote.

Nine republicans and 13 Democrats voted against it.

There are currently 22-states with similar laws in place, but Democrats in the House are trying to stop the bill from moving forward.

Party members walked out of the session again Monday in an effort to halt the legislation.

They are pushing for it to be put on a referendum during the November election.

Bosma Vows Fines for House No-Shows

Jan 18, 2012

If Indiana House Democrats don’t show up for work Wednesday, they will be fined.

Speaker Brian Bosma says he will penalize members who abstain from participating in the session $1,000 for every day they are absent.

Democrats didn’t show up to the floor Tuesday in protest of Right-To-Work legislation, even though, according to Bosma, Minority Leader Pat Bauer promised his party would.

Bauer insists Democrats need more time to draft a new amendment because he says the proposal to put the issue to a statewide referendum may be unconstitutional.

Democrats Want RTW to be Placed on Nov. Ballot

Jan 13, 2012

Hoosier voters would decide if Indiana becomes the 23rd Right-To-Work state under a plan from House Democrats.

The party wants to place the issue on the November ballot as a referendum.

Leaders say, that way, residents can decide the future of Indiana’s labor laws.

However, Republican leadership says doing so is not common practice and insists the bill will go through the appropriate democratic process on the floor beginning next week.

The measure would prohibit unions and companies from charging dues to non-members.

Klinker Wants Referendum for Right-To-Work

Jan 9, 2012

Work at the Statehouse in Indianapolis is underway.

Democrats have returned to the House Chamber after preventing the start of the session last week in an effort to block the Right-To-Work bill from moving forward.

Democratic Lafayette-area Representative Sheila Klinker says she is discouraged by the combative nature of the debate.

Klinker wants lawmakers to put the issue on the November ballot as a referendum.

She says this will allow Hoosiers to have a greater voice in determining if Indiana becomes the 23rd Right-To-Work state.

A local group fighting against proposed Right-To-Work legislation is calling for more input on the issue.

Lafayette Working Families is holding a news conference at 3 p.m. Friday at the Tippecanoe County Courthouse to encourage legislators to hold statewide hearings on the proposed bill.

Republican Randy Truitt supports Right-To-Work and says there is benefit to these types of information sessions, but adds that with the session underway, those events will delay progress.

House Democrats are trying to stall voting on the measure by preventing a quorum.

Radio and television commercials will begin airing across the state encouraging Hoosiers to contact their state legislators to urge them to oppose the “Right to Work for Less” law being proposed in the Indiana General Assembly.

A series of 30 second television and 60 second radio spots will run in areas where recent polling conducted by the Indiana State AFL-CIO and its partners has shown constituents oppose the measure. 

Titled “Wrong Priorities,” the ads were paid for by a coalition of Indiana State AFL-CIO affiliates and non-affiliated unions.

Indiana lawmakers return to Indianapolis January 4th for the new session.  The top issue appears to be a bill that would give Hoosiers the option to join a union as opposed to being required to pay dues.   As WBAA’s Sam Klemet explains, those on both sides say there are economic benefits and drawbacks.

Right-To-Work legislation is expected to be proposed during Indiana’s upcoming General Assembly session.

However, union groups and others are pushing back against it.

Becky Smith with the state AFLCIO attended a forum on the subject Sunday in Lafayette.

She says preventing Right-To-Work is about more than just wages and salaries, it’s a civil rights issue.

Electrical Union Member Brent Green says the proposed legislation will be detrimental to most Hoosiers.