Riley Hospital for Children at Indiana University Health

Teen First In Indiana To Recieve New Cancer Treatment

Sep 10, 2018
Kylee Sweat is Riley Hospital’s first ever CAR T patient and the first pediatric patient to start treatment in Indiana. (Photo Iu Riley Hospital)
Jill Sheridan

An Indiana teenager is the first in the state to receive a new type of cancer treatment for leukemia. CAR T cell therapy was just approved by the FDA last year. 

Safe Gun Storage Lags In Homes With Children

Mar 2, 2018
Courtesy of Riley Hospital IU Health

An estimated 39 percent of Hoosiers have firearms and a new study find many of those guns are not stored properly.

A report published in the Journal Pediatrics states only an estimated one third of Indiana households with guns store them safely.

The report from the American Academy of Pediatrics specifically asked for the mental health history of children in the home and if firearms are stored locked and unloaded.

New Program Aims To Reduce Number Of Infant Deaths

Oct 13, 2016
Valentina Powers / https://www.flickr.com/photos/valentinap/253659858

Every woman who gives birth at one of seven Indiana University Health hospitals across the state will receive a sleep sack through a new initiative to decrease infant deaths.  The sacks are like wearable blankets, unlikely to get caught around a baby’s nose and mouth.

The initiative is funded through a partnership with Riley Children’s Health and the Indianapolis Colts, and Riley’s Dr. Kim Schneider says unsafe sleep practice is one of the top three causes of infant death in Indiana, but it is a preventable one.

Michael Coghlan / https://www.flickr.com/photos/mikecogh/

Indiana has the second-highest percentage in the nation of children who have a parent who’s been incarcerated. A new study shows this can have long lasting effects on a child’s wellness.

According to the National Survey of Children’s Health, 11-percent of Hoosier children have a parent who has been incarcerated.  A new report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation highlights the impact that time behind bars has on children.

Associate Professor at IU School of Medicine and Riley Hospital for Children Pediatric Dr. Matthew Aalsma, says the report is a valuable tool.

Indiana Expert: Drownings Can Happen In An Instant

Jun 23, 2014
M. Kuhlman

Experts are reminding Indiana parents to be vigilant when their summer fun with the kids involves water.

Earlier this month, two young brothers drowned in a pond in Hobart, and a teen boy drowned near Whiting last week after jumping off a pier into Lake Michigan.

A child should never go into the water without being watched closely by an adult, said Dr. Joseph O'Neil, a neurodevelopmental pediatrician at Riley Hospital for Children at Indiana University Health, because tragedy can happen in an instant.