road paving

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

The week leading up to our monthly conversation with Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski has been one of political comings and goings.

Gary State Senator Eddie Melton made his run for governor official, as did Lafayette resident Joe Mackey, who’ll seek to represent Indiana's 4th Congressional District in Congress.

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we find out what Mayor Roswarski would like to see his party’s nominees run on next year, such that Lafayette would benefit.

Also this week, West Lafayette Mayor John Dennis announced he’s dropping out of his only scheduled debate in this year’s election – less than two weeks before it was to happen. We’ll ask Mayor Roswarski, a longtime friend and former Lafayette Police Department colleague of Mayor Dennis, what he thinks of that move.

City of West Lafayette

We already know of one New Year’s resolution for West Lafayette Mayor John Dennis – his plan to seek a fourth term in office. But some Ask The Mayor listeners have a couple others they’d like him to make.

One person wants the city to place a ban on the electric scooters on which Purdue students have been zipping around the city for a few months.

When you drive over a pothole in your neighborhood, you can report it to the city and hope they come fix it soon – or you can fix it yourself. At least, that’s what one Indianapolis man has been doing this year.

Michael Warren’s project, which he calls Open Source roads, reveals a lot about the different ways residents and governments try to care for their communities.

City of Frankfort

We’ve talked a lot with Frankfort’s Chris McBarnes about road repaving here on Ask The Mayor.

Usually, it’s a question about why SR28 is in such bad shape.

But this week, a more positive tone – when the city’s bids come in lower than expected, more paving can be done, But how much more?

Also on this week’s program, some talk about public safety. The city has had a hard time gaining accreditation from a group of police chiefs, in part because of poor evidence handling. We’ll ask what’s held that up for three years.

JW801 / https://www.flickr.com/photos/132926214@N07/21120045540/

A key legislator says a review of whether INDOT contractors have been using substandard asphalt could complicate efforts to increase highway funding.

INDOT instructs contractors to use recycled asphalt, and has been testing samples to see if the recipe is causing roads to deteriorate sooner than they should. Depending on how many roads fail those tests, it could cost the state as much as $71 million in extra repaving costs.

House Roads and Transportation Chairman Ed Soliday (R-Valparaiso) says he's "not super-concerned" about the issue: