roads

Sarah Fentem / WBAA

The Lafayette City Council Monday approved the first reading of a new ordinance aimed at preserving the city’s remaining brick streets.

The ordinance would require the city to re-pave and restore brick streets with brick, rather than concrete or asphalt.

Only nine stretches of brick street remain in Lafayette, mostly clustered around downtown and in the city’s Southwestern Highland Park neighborhood.

 

Legislative leaders laid out their vision for the upcoming session as newly elected and re-elected lawmakers were sworn in. It’s the event known as Organization Day, the ceremonial gathering of a new General Assembly each November.

The majority party leaders – this year, House Speaker Brian Bosma and Senate President Pro Tem David Long – called for renewed focus and bipartisanship as they tackle the job of crafting a long-term, sustainable road funding plan. Bosma’s call comes with only one caveat.

City of Lafayette

Why is part of South Street closed?

Will the trees come back along Main Street?

When, oh when, will Sagamore Parkway be done?

Can the city construct a winning baseball team?

All those questions and more on this week's Ask The Mayor with Lafayette's Tony Roswarski.

Lee Coursey / https://www.flickr.com/photos/leeco/

Governor Mike Pence says he welcomes House Democrats to the road funding conversation but believes their $2 billion infrastructure proposal could bankrupt the state.  

Pence still doesn’t have an answer for how local communities fit into his own roads plan.

Jim Grey / https://www.flickr.com/photos/mobilene/

Indiana House Democrats this week unveiled their proposal to solve some of the state’s road maintenance issues.  The Minority Leader says it goes further than the governor’s plan by providing help to local communities.

The House Democrats’ plan would divert sales tax revenues on gasoline and special fuels to road maintenance.  Minority Leader Scott Pelath says that would have generated $525 million this year and, under the Democrats’ proposal, would have been split between state and local roads, with 53 percent to the state and 47 percent to locals.

Courtesy Crawfordsville Mayor's Office

It’s been a summer of sometimes frustrating road construction for Crawfordsville. Its local streets have been buffeted by orange cones and snarled by stopped trains and its interstate construction was delayed because of the I-65 mess in Tippecanoe County.

So this week on Ask The Mayor, we have Todd Barton weigh in on Governor Pence’s new road funding plan – which doesn’t give any new money to local road projects.

INDOT Orders Construction Company: Repair Roads Or Pay Up

Sep 28, 2015
Lee Coursey / https://www.flickr.com/photos/leeco/

The Indiana Department of Transportation is asking a former contractor to either repave a stretch of Indiana highway that’s prematurely deteriorating or else reimburse the state the amount it paid the company in 2012. The demand comes as the agency looks into nearly 200 completed projects it suspects could contain subpar asphalt.

Michael Gil / https://www.flickr.com/photos/msvg/4304094088

As Republicans and Democrats argue about the state of Indiana's roads and bridges, a nonpartisan report card is supplying ammo to both sides.

The American Society of Civil Engineers issues a 50-state report card every four years. The last one, from 2013, showed one in six major roads in Indiana in poor condition, the 18th-worst percentage in the country.

The 10-percent of bridges rated structurally deficient is the 22nd-worst.

However, the report card was issued two years ago and is based on data from three years before that.

Hammond Mayor Considering Challenging John Gregg

Aug 11, 2015
City of Hammond

One potential candidate for governor needs to get through this year's elections first.

Thomas McDermott, Jr. hasn't been mentioned much in gubernatorial discussions since announcing he'd run for a fourth term as mayor of Hammond. But he never ruled out back-to-back races, and says he's still pondering what his next political step should be.

McDermott had said he wouldn't run if one of the candidates already running took firm control of the race.

Senate Finance Committee

In 2005, Mitch Daniels brokered the Major Moves deal -- leasing the Indiana toll-road for $3.8 billion for 75 years.  He told a Senate committee looking for infrastructure improvement ideas Thursday the public-private partnership was a high point of his term.

"It was a great joy of public service to watch literally the dreams of decades, become real.  Project after project of people saying 'that’ll never happen' are in being in Indiana," Daniels said.

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