Safe Haven Baby Boxes

First Baby Box To Open In Central Indiana

Jun 22, 2018

The Hoosier State’s third baby box will be installed in a central Indiana fire station. Indiana lawmakers approved legislation this year to expand the state’s Safe Haven law to allow 24 hour fire stations to install baby boxes. 

Monica Kelsey is a firefighter and founder of Safe Haven Baby Box. She says the option is safe.

The vast majority of House lawmakers approved a bill to legalize baby boxes in hospitals – over the objections of the Department of Child Services.

The measure now also sanctions the state’s two existing boxes.

Baby boxes are intended to provide mothers with more anonymity when dropping off newborns. Current law gives people immunity from child abandonment charges only if the baby is delivered to another person.

Rep. Martin Carbaugh (R-Fort Wayne) says the reality is that some mothers aren’t willing to face another person when dropping off their newborn.

A House committee moved a bill to the floor legalizing so-called “baby boxes” while putting in jeopardy the status of the state’s two existing devices.

Baby boxes are meant to be a more anonymous way for someone to leave an unwanted newborn. There are concerns surrounding the devices, focused on a lack of testing, industry standards, or best practices.

 

Senate lawmakers overwhelmingly approved legislation to legalize the use of baby boxes, but only in hospitals.

The boxes are meant to be a more anonymous way for someone to leave an unwanted newborn. The bill makes it legal to drop off a baby in a designated box in a hospital without facing child abandonment charges.

Baby Box Legalization Effort Halted In Committee

Feb 13, 2017

 

An effort to legalize baby boxes in Indiana was halted in a Senate committee hearing about the boxes, which are meant to provide mothers an extra layer of anonymity when dropping off unwanted newborns.

First Safe Haven Baby Drop-off Boxes Installed In Indiana

Apr 27, 2016
Safe Haven Baby Boxes / safehavenbabyboxes.com

The first baby boxes in the country are being unveiled at two northern Indiana fire stations this week. The boxes act as incubators to protect babies abandoned under the state’s Safe Haven law, passed in 2015.

Indiana law allows parents of unwanted newborns to give up their babies at fire stations, police departments and hospitals. The Safe Haven Baby Boxes aim to keep those parents anonymous and their baby safe.

Ruin Raider / https://www.flickr.com/photos/bobex_pics/6246813737

Indiana's Commission on Improving the Status of Children voted Wednesday not to pursue a statewide newborn safety incubator program.  But advocates of the so-called “baby boxes” say there’s hope for progress in the future.

Baby boxes, installed into the walls of “safe haven” locations, are meant to provide mothers an extra layer of anonymity when dropping off unwanted newborns. 

Elliott Bledsoe / https://www.flickr.com/photos/elliottbledsoe/

The Senate has unanimously endorsed a first step toward creating "baby boxes" for abandoned newborns.

Since 2000, Indiana has had a "safe haven" law allowing babies to be dropped off anonymously at hospitals or fire stations. A House bill would go a step further and allow the installation of incubator dropboxes.

Rep. Casey Cox (R-Fort Wayne) says there have been cases in which parents don‘t trust the promise of anonymity and abandon infants in parks or trash bins -- exactly the scenario the safe haven law was intended to prevent.

State Could Provide 'Safe Haven' Baby Boxes For Parents

Feb 26, 2015
Eric Allix Rogers / https://www.flickr.com/photos/reallyboring/2755708614/

Indiana could become the first state to put out boxes designed for parents to put babies in when giving those children up.

The Safe Haven Baby Boxes bill was passed unanimously by the House as an alternative to parents abandoning children in unsafe areas.

Fort Wayne firefighter and paramedic Monica Kelsey says not enough parents know about the Safe Haven Law and there need to be more options for desperate parents.