school funding

Senate Republicans rejected more than two dozen amendments offered by Democrats to the budget bill Monday.

Senate Republicans released their budget proposal Thursday, but Democrats say plans to address teacher pay are still lacking.

A new study shows hate crimes laws often aren’t utilized. House lawmakers change a school bus safety bill. And a Senate panel advances a bill to loosen restrictions on adoption advertising.

Here’s what you might have missed this week at the Statehouse.

Hate Crimes Research

Senate lawmakers heard hours of testimony Thursday from teachers and education professionals urging the state to give schools, and ultimately teachers, more money

Hundreds of school professionals met in Bloomington this week to focus on how they educate children – including their emotional and social needs – and organizers say the efforts could help Indiana make progress on key education issues.

The House Ways and Means Committee debates the Republican caucus's budget proposal. (Brandon Smith/IPB News)
Brandon Smith

House Republican leaders say they’re confident they’ve made a significant education investment in their state budget proposal.

Taylor Haggerty / WBAA News

A Saturday breakfast with lawmakers who represent Tippecanoe County in the Indiana General Assembly generated so many questions from attendees about education that moderators had to offer more time for the legislators to respond.

West Lafayette Rep. Chris Campbell says lawmakers are considering boosting school funding by two percent, but she says that might not be enough.

“At face value, it doesn’t look like the funding is going to be adequate enough to cover things like those pay raises that those teachers much need,” Campbell says.

A lawsuit against Indianapolis Public Schools claims the district used deceptive marketing about a university partnership to attract a family to one of its schools. At least one expert says without any marketing regulations, misinformation and segregation in schools could continue.

Candidates aren’t the only ones with high hopes during election season, as schools turn to voters for more funding support. This November there are a dozen school construction and operations referenda up for consideration – that’s more than any other November election since 2010.

But local tax expert and Purdue professor of agricultural economics Larry DeBoer says school referenda are still pretty rare statewide. About 60 percent of districts have never asked voters to approve additional funding for their schools.

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA News

In the second of WBAA’s mini-golf conversations about the 2018 elections, Indiana State Senate candidates Sherry Shipley and Ron Alting hit the links for what’s likely to be their only joint question-and-answer session this election season -- at least if Alting's camp gets its way.

EDITOR'S NOTE: A candidate's miniature golf score should NOT be construed, in any way, as reflecting a candidate's fitness for office.

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