school resource officer

Days after a student with a gun was arrested outside a Muncie high school, Gov. Eric Holcomb held an event highlighting two school safety bills in Southern Indiana Friday, but Democrats in the General Assembly are calling for more action on school safety and firearms during the next legislative session. 

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

Tippecanoe County Sheriff Candidate Bob Goldsmith says his plan for school safety, if he’s elected in November, is to keep doing what the county is already doing.

Goldsmith struggled Friday to say what would differentiate his plan from a current initiative at campuses across the county.

The program rotates two officers through 20 county schools, and students may not always be aware ahead of time which days School Resource Officers, or SROs, are in their building.

Courtesy Frankfort Police Department / Facebook

Despite Frankfort Mayor Chris McBarnes’ recent statement suggesting metal detectors would be installed at Frankfort Community Schools, city officials say they probably won’t be added in the immediate future.

Frankfort Assistant Superintendent Joel McKinney says no final decisions have been made. But the district is leaning toward adding more school resource officers first.

Bill Would Track When Officers Restrain, Seclude Kids At School

Mar 29, 2017

Indiana lawmakers may require schools to provide more information about a controversial practice: secluding and restraining children.

Under state law, physical restraints and seclusion may only be used as a last resort to calm students and never to discipline. The state requires schools to report all uses of seclusion and restraint by school staff. The practices are generally used for students with severe disabilities who have violent outbursts.

Indiana schools are sharing $9 million in Secured School Safety grants. Those come from a program with dedicated state funds that provides matching grants to schools.

The money can cover the cost of employing a school resource officer, conducting a threat assessment, or purchasing security equipment.

Schools in Tippecanoe and surrounding counties were awarded roughly $600,000 in matching grants.

Changes to a school safety bill made in a House committee will allow Indiana public schools to opt-out of a requirement that each facility employ armed personnel.  But critics say the changes still don’t solve core problems with the bill.

A new proposal from Attorney General Greg Zoeller and a GOP state senator would help Indiana schools put more police officers in their buildings.