SNAP

Emilie Syberg / WBAA

This summer, users of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program—commonly known as food stamps—can show their benefits card to catch a free ride to Greater Lafayette farmer’s markets—and, in West Lafayette, make their money go twice as far through a new program that doubles their benefits.

Greg Seiters is trying to decide if the extra funds outweigh the wait time.

“Well,” Seiters says, “generally, they’re on time.”

He’s waiting at a CityBus stop near his Lafayette home on a sweltering Wednesday afternoon.

Food insecurity in Indiana is down slightly according to an annual report from Feeding America but Hoosiers are still more likely to face hunger than the national average.

The St. Vincent DePaul food pantry in Indianapolis. (Jill Sheridan/IPB News)
Doug Jaggers

Whether it’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program eligibility, pantry hours or free lunch at the library, it can be difficult to navigate food assistance programs.  

A new mobile tool aims to connect people in Indianapolis with food. It's called Food Compass and was created as part of a competition to address civic problems through technology.  

U.S. Senate Takes Up Farm Bill After House Bill Fails

Jun 12, 2018
Produce from local farmers is unloaded at the Lafayette-based Food Finders. (FILE PHOTO: Jill Sheridan/IPB News)
Lauren Chapman

After the farm bill failed in the U.S. House last month, it’s the Senate’s turn to take the legislation up. Wednesday's Senate hearing is unlikely to be as controversial. 

City of West Lafayette

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we’re digging into West Lafayette’s growing pains. One of the city's roundabout projects just won an award, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t complaints. And, the city is gearing up for several more development projects both downtown and near the local airport. So how does a city maintain – or shape a new – identity when so much of the past has to be torn down?

The St. Vincent DePaul food pantry in Indianapolis. (Jill Sheridan/IPB News)
Doug Jaggers

The federal farm bill failed in the House on Friday, largely over issues on immigration reform. But another contentious issue divided Indiana representatives. A provision in the bill would have required people on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program — or SNAP — to work or attend job training for 20 hours a week. 

Emilie Syberg / WBAA

On Saturday mornings between May and October, a crowd converges on downtown Lafayette to visit the Lafayette Farmer's Market.

Though it doesn’t take them yet, it’s one of 75 markets in Indiana officially authorized to accept benefits from the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP.

People are said to experience food insecurity when they do not have access to enough food for all family members to live a healthy, active life. An annual report measures the rate of food insecurity in Indiana slightly under the national average, almost 14 percent of the population. 

The county where the Map the Meal Gap report found the highest rate of food insecurity is Marion County, at 18.3 percent. The county with the lowest measured rate is Hamilton County, at 8.8 percent.  

Caden Crawford / https://www.flickr.com/photos/cadencrawford/

A bill before the Indiana House Committee on Family, Children and Human Affairs would make more people eligible for Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program, or SNAP, benefits.

U.S. Department of Agriculture / https://www.flickr.com/photos/usdagov/

A Senate committee on Monday approved a bill that would extend Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits — also known as SNAP or food stamps — to former offenders convicted of certain drug-related offenses.

A federal law prohibits former criminals convicted of, for example, trafficking controlled substances, from receiving food stamp benefits. States can choose to do away with the federal ban with a positive legislative vote.

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