teacher pay

Hoosier teachers looking to the General Assembly to boost educator salaries in the 2020 session shouldn’t hold out hope.

Legislative leaders from both parties say they’re looking forward to Tuesday’s teacher rally at the Statehouse.

But Republicans and Democrats still seem split on the education issues driving the public demonstration.

Richard Lee / https://www.flickr.com/photos/70109407@N00/

Nearly a third of the Tippecanoe School Corporation’s teachers have now asked for personal days next Tuesday, causing Superintendent Scott Hanback to announce the corporation will shut down that day.

The teachers will be going to the Statehouse for Organization Day – a time when lawmakers plan for the official start of the legislative calendar in January.

WFIU / https://www.flickr.com/photos/wfiupublicradio/

Of Tippecanoe County’s three school corporations, so far only Lafayette School Corporation officials plan to close for next week’s “Red For Ed” rally at the Indiana Statehouse.

Some 130 LSC educators have asked for the day off, so Superintendent Les Huddle Monday decided to cancel classes on November 19, allowing his teachers to rally in front of state lawmakers.

Huddle says the district could not find enough substitute teachers to cover those who’ve requested personal days next Tuesday, so he had no choice but to cancel classes.

State lawmakers have pointed to school referendum measures as one way to raise teachers’ pay, and a new state analysis reveals just how much teacher pay has increased in districts with voter-approved funding.

Indiana’s first openly gay major party candidate for governor announced his bid Monday.

Indianapolis tech entrepreneur Josh Owens will seek the Democratic nomination.

Teachers have rallied at schools and the statehouse all year to push for better pay and more respect for their profession, and last month teachers throughout the state flocked to the governor’s teacher pay commission input meetings to reinforce an idea: Indiana’s education policy doesn’t respect public educators. 

Hoosier teachers are telling lawmakers they feel disrespected after last session’s discussion on teacher pay.  And as Indiana Public Broadcasting’s Stephanie Wiechmann reports, the state schools chief says that’s evident in the amount of teachers leaving the job.

Pat Kennedy leads the Muncie Teachers Association.  She says when she began teaching, it was a career to last your whole professional life.  Now she says mentoring young teachers has changed.

The governor’s Teacher Compensation Commission will host public comment sessions across the state in August. 

Leadership at the state’s largest teachers union is changing this summer, and the incoming president says he plans to focus more on local schools’ needs.

Keith Gambill has been the Indiana State Teachers Association vice president for six years, and later this summer he’ll become president after members elected him to the position this spring.

Pages