Tippecanoe County

Wind turbines sit on farmland surrounding a home
Taylor Haggerty / WBAA News

West Lafayette will not adopt a ban on large wind turbines going into effect in Tippecanoe County. The city council voted against the ordinance this week.

The ordinance prevents turbines over 140 feet in the county, and county commissioners say it’s to keep the land free for economic development. They have repeatedly said the ban isn’t a statement against renewable energy or environmentally-friendly technology.

But City Council President Peter Bunder disagrees.

“It’s also about environmental energy. And it’s - it’d be difficult to separate those,” Bunder says.

Wind turbines sit on farmland surrounding a home
Taylor Haggerty / WBAA News

Wind energy is a growing industry in Indiana, but not every community is receptive to the development. Tippecanoe County is working on a proposal to ban wind farms, and Montgomery County is in the midst of an intense debate over two proposed farms.

AFP / Getty Images

A bill passed earlier this year by the Indiana General Assembly allowing cities to charge registration fees to those who rent property on sites such as Airbnb doesn’t appear to have hurt revenues in Greater Lafayette.

Airbnb officials say fans flocking to Purdue home football games this fall ballooned the profits of Greater Lafayette Airbnb hosts, who made close to $34,000 from the 370 guests staying for the Ohio State game alone, which amounts to an average of about $91 per guest.

Airbnb usage in Tippecanoe County has risen considerably in the past 12 months.

Tippecanoe, Howard Among Pre-K Expansion Counties

Jun 7, 2017

Low-income families in 15 counties will soon be able to use state money to send their 4-year-old children to preschool. Indiana’s first pre-K pilot included five counties – some urban and some rural.

One of the additional counties is Delaware, where Carrie Bale runs the By5 Early Childhood Initiative. She says while she’s glad for the new opportunity, the expansion includes a new requirement that could exclude families that need the service.

Eric J Paparatto / https://www.flickr.com/photos/ejpphoto/

Many Tippecanoe County homeowners will likely see an increase when their property tax bills arrive next month.

But County Auditor Bob Plantenga says some residents may see a slight decrease. 

The actual dollar amount will depend on where the property is located.

deepfruit / https://www.flickr.com/photos/slippek/

Tippecanoe County has received about one-fourth of the grant money it requested to fund a syringe exchange services program aimed at slowing the spread of Hepatitis C among I-V drug users.

Commissioner Tracy Brown says the county accepted an $8,500 grant from the Health Foundation of Greater Indianapolis.

The county had asked for nearly $33,000.

But Brown insists that’s a good first step toward obtaining cash to buy supplies for the program that, under state law, cannot be funded with taxpayer dollars.

MAP: Most Dangerous Intersections In Tippecanoe County

Dec 22, 2016
Charles Wagner / https://www.flickr.com/photos/chazwags/325170829

Changing traffic patterns in Tippecanoe County have changed how dangerous it is to drive on some roads.

That’s the key finding from new data released by the Area Plan Commission showing which intersections experience the most fender benders.

It’s no surprise the roads with the heaviest volume of traffic top Tippecanoe County’s ranking of intersections with the most significant injury crashes.

Chris Morisse Vizza/WBAA News

The Tippecanoe County Commissioners voted Monday to endorse a plan to establish a syringe exchange and services program aimed at reducing the spread of hepatitis C among intravenous drug users.

But Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski vented his frustrations after the vote.

One by one, doctors, addiction treatment professionals, researchers, church leaders and a captain from the Fort Wayne police department stepped to the podium to tell the commissioners why Tippecanoe County should create a syringe services program.

Jessica Whittle Photography / https://www.flickr.com/photos/jessiewhittle/3003345413

PRESIDENT

Trump/Pence (R):  48.59%

Clinton/Kaine (D): 43.05%

Johnson/Weld (L): 6.33%

U.S. SENATE

Todd Young (R): 47.72%

Evan Bayh (D): 45.86%

Lucy Brenton (L): 6.36%

GOVERNOR

Eric Holcomb (R): 48.09%

John Gregg (D): 48.21%

Rex Bell (L): 3.66%

ATTORNEY GENERAL

Curtis T. Hill, Jr. (R): 58.06%

Lorenzo Arredondo (D): 41.94%

SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION

Glenda Ritz (D): 51.84%

Sarah Fentem / WBAA

Voters hoping to cast their ballots on the final day of early voting Monday faced massive lines and hours-long waits, although there were worse days to be stuck in line outside. 

The early voters waiting at the Tippecanoe County Office Building enjoyed crystal blue skies and balmy 70-degree temperatures during what, for some, was a three-hour wait. 

At least one person came to vote, saw the sign advertising the long wait and left.

Tippecanoe County’s Timothy Rodriquez was voting early because he was going to be out-of-state Tuesday.

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