Tony Roswarski

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

It’s not often that cities turn down all the bids they receive for a project, but that’s just what Lafayette’s Board of Works did this week on a road paving and sidewalk improvement job.

And to hear Mayor Tony Roswarski tell it, this story might be more common in the coming years, because it’s a seller’s market in the construction trades. A lack of qualified workers means companies don’t have the manpower to do all the available jobs at once, and they can pick and choose only the most lucrative projects – and charge more for the work than they used to.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

We say often on Ask The Mayor that if a topic is affecting one community in our rotation, there’s a good chance it’s affecting others, too.

For months, we’ve talked to West Lafayette Mayor John Dennis about a lack of coordination between traffic signals in the city. Now, two listeners have written in to ask why Lafayette seems to be battling a similar issue.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski has already announced his intention to run for a fifth term in office when next year’s elections roll around. But this week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we ponder whether the increasingly nasty tone of this year’s races is causing him to think about what may be a more bruising political climate when he runs next.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

In this week’s elections in Tippecanoe County, Democrats fielded a candidate in just two of the seven countywide races. It’s the continuation of a trend of apathy from the party in recent years.

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we talk with the highest-ranking Democrat in the county – Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski – about what that dearth of participation means for his party – especially in a year where Democrats were supposed to be energized.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

If there’s one thing we here at WBAA want you to know about Ask The Mayor, it’s this: when you have a question, ask it!

On this week’s conversation with Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski, one of our youngest question-askers ever – just 12 years old – engages the mayor on a public policy question that the cities of Lafayette and West Lafayette have decided differently.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

In his state of the city address this week, Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski mentioned that drug arrests were way up, year over year.

Any time there’s such a large change in a number like this, the question becomes: was there more crime, were police focusing more effort on rooting it out, or both?

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

There’s a meeting scheduled for later this month in Lafayette to talk about the city’s drug addiction issues. Registration to speak was so popular the venue had to be changed to accommodate more people.

This week on WBAA’s “Ask The Mayor,” we chat with Lafayette’s Tony Roswarski about what that says for a city that’s struggled to even keep drug use from growing in recent years.

Steve Cook / www.flickr.com/photos/firefighter0793/3447757181

Lafayette officials are hoping to bring more exotic animals to the Columbian Park Zoo menagerie – including large cats and…

“We’re working right now on building a penguin exhibit,” says Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski, speaking on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor Program. “Because that’s something people want.”

Roswarski says the building costs for a penguin exhibit total about $1.6 million.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we’re talking about what’s going to happen when the dust clears from the coming months’ construction. Will we see a new, or just a slightly improved, Lafayette? When it comes to improving quality of life, how swiftly is the city prepared to act?

We ask Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski how the city balances cleaning up the streets while launching a string of projects this past year, meant to attract people to Lafayette. But once they’re here, how do you get them to stay?

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

In his state of the city address this week, Lafayette Mayor Tony Roswarski touted reductions in many different categories of crime.

But publicly available data created by the Lafayette Police Department doesn’t seem to jibe with the mayor’s announced statistics.

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we ask him to explain how his numbers are so different from the ones the public can see.


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