tourism

courtesy City of Frankfort

In February, WBAA held a public forum in Frankfort which asked residents, in part: What's the "thing" that the city should be known for?

The most workable answer then seemed to be drawing in more visitors when the annual Festival of Lights show goes up each winter.

On this week's Ask The Mayor, we talk with Mayor Chris McBarnes about how his city has doubled down on trying to become just such a cold weather cash cow.

Legislators Discuss Money For Beach Erosion Study

Aug 8, 2019

UPDATE: At the state agriculture and natural resources committee meeting, legislators recommended that the state find the money for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers study into solutions to Lake Michigan beach erosion. There’s no telling whether the governor and the state budget committee will act upon that recommendation. 

homeofpurdue.com

May 5th though 11th marks National Travel and Tourism week. In the Greater Lafayette Area, Visit Lafayette-West Lafayette is marking local sites and businesses with a Tourism Tailgate Party on Wednesday, May 8th from 4 to 7pm. WBAA's John Clare spoke with president Jo Wade, and director of communication, Sara Erickson about the event, and the impact of tourism on the community.

Purdue University researchers have released a report highlighting challenges the state’s tourism industry may face in the upcoming century due to climate change, as well as offering suggestions for how to prepare.

Carly Rosenberger / WBAA News

Tippecanoe County’s Exploration Acres has experienced a sharp increase in ticket sales following the opening of this season’s corn maze, based on the hit Netflix television series Stranger Things

Exploration Acres President Tim Fitzgerald is an avid fan of Stranger Things. He says the maze has significantly influenced the farm’s revenue this fall.

A Purdue professor has found that rooms rented on sites such as Airbnb benefit white neighborhoods, but do less good for black and Latino areas.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

In the 21st Century, it’s a bit of an open question how small-to-midsized Indiana cities will attract industry or grow their population base.

Gone are the days of a railroad or a new university creating a boomtown, so what’s a place like Crawfordsville to do?

The answer is probably not going to be “build a windfarm,” so perhaps instead of trying to grow the permanent populace, the city can try to attract visitors on more weekends.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

This spring is dotted with important meetings in Crawfordsville – meetings which could help decide the near future of the city.

Whether it’s talking with state transportation leaders about how the city fits into the state’s long-term plans or meeting with parents concerned about greater incidence of students taking their own lives, the community has some important decisions to make.

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we talk with Crawfordsville’s Todd Barton about the stakes for a town that’s hoping for a rebirth.

White County CAFO Rule Would Join Patchwork Of Regulations

May 12, 2016
Annie Ropeik/Indiana Public Broadcasting

White County is on its way to passing the state's first rule for protecting a waterway from big livestock farms. It's designed to shield the Tippecanoe River Basin and its residents from pollution and farm odors.

White County Hog Barn Raises Environmental Concerns

Oct 13, 2015
US Department of Agriculture / https://www.flickr.com/photos/usdagov/

For the second time in two years, the White County Area Plan commission will consider a rezoning request for a confined feeding hog operation that is opposed by neighboring residents.

Gary and Connie Rice want to build a barn that would house 4,000 hogs on nearly seven acres of land.

To do that, the land must be rezoned from General Agriculture to Agricultural Industry.

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