trade war

Taiwanese business groups signed a new two-year agreement Monday that increases the amount of corn and soybeans Taiwan companies purchase from Indiana. The new agreement comes at a time when many Hoosier farmers are struggling in part due to the ongoing trade war with China.

Courtesy of Purdue University Center for Commercial Agriculture

A recent measure of agricultural sentiment showed farmers increasingly worried about their economic futures. 

The Ag Economy Barometer saw the largest single-month drop since it was created in 2016. Barometer principal investigator Jim Mintert says farmers are worried about low commodity prices and continuing tariffs. 

The 2019 Manufacturing Scorecard puts Indiana among the top five states for manufacturing and logistics. Indiana continues to show success in areas including global reach and tax climate where other states are struggling.

U.S. Steel announced Friday the company will idle its East Chicago Tin mill where an estimated 150 workers could face layoffs.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture released updated numbers Monday showing farmers planted more acres this spring than many private analysts expected. That’s one of several factors driving market prices lower for many farmers’ crops.

The latest escalation in the trade war with China is driving uncertainty for many Indiana businesses. One Indiana trade group is working to help companies find some stability in new markets.

In a recent survey, most Indiana farmers say the Trump administration's trade policy is putting their operations in “jeopardy.”

Indiana businesses are concerned the escalated trade war between the United States and China will hurt their financial future.

Farmers' Economic Optimism Drops In Latest Survey

May 14, 2019

Farmers' confidence in the economy tumbled last month, according to the latest Ag Economy Barometer reading. The April survey had the fourth largest sentiment index drop since it began in 2015.

(wuestenigel/Flickr)
Samantha Horton

Retailers say that they can’t absorb the extra costs from the Trump administration’s increased tariffs on billions of dollars in Chinese imports. Now consumers can expect to see price increases when shopping.

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