Travel ban

From left, ACLU of Indiana's Gavin Rose, Exodus Refugee Immigration's Sara Hindi, and Muslim Alliance of Indiana's Aliya Amin discuss the Supreme Court's decision on Pres. Trump's Muslim travel ban. (Brandon Smith/IPB News)
Brandon Smith

Indiana Muslim and refugee organization leaders say they’re disappointed the Supreme Court upheld President Donald Trump’s ban on travel from several predominantly Muslim nations.

The groups say despite what the court ruled, the ban is a "racist and discriminatory policy.”

Purdue University

Very few freshmen in Purdue University’s incoming class are affected by President Trump’s latest immigration order. And for those students who are, the school is hoping to secure waivers of the travel ban. 

Prospective Purdue students from countries affected by President Trump’s new executive order may face difficulty in obtaining their student visas if their waiver requests are denied.

NIAID / https://www.flickr.com/photos/niaid/

Indiana State Department of Health officials say they're monitoring six people who have traveled to Indiana from West Africa. Those being monitored are considered low risk for Ebola infection and are cooperating with health officials.

The health department says these measures are in accordance with new travel guidance issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC says all travelers to Indiana from Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea will be under what it calls "direct active monitoring" by their local health department for 21 days upon entering the country.