Tuition

Jae Lee / WBAA News

Next year, Purdue opens its Polytechnic High School in Indianapolis. It’ll work within the Indianapolis Public Schools, but also be a competitor in some ways.

And it’ll offer something no other high school in Indiana does – direct admission to a university upon graduation.

So as more and more schools advertise to lure students away from their competitors, does Purdue have an unfair advantage?

We pose that question to Mitch Daniels on this month’s conversation with him.

John Walker / https://www.flickr.com/photos/whatcouldgowrong/4608963722

A state program that covers up to 100-percent of college tuition is seeing more students ready to graduate in four years. State officials credit the rise to a 2013 law requiring students complete a certain number of credits each year -- or lose their aid.

Commissioner of Higher Education Teresa Lubbers says there’s only so much state financial aid money available.

“You always have limited state dollars, so you want to spread those as broadly as you can to benefit the largest number of students,” Lubbers says.

Purdue University

Mitch Daniels has tried to make his time as Purdue President about student affordability – so this month in our regular conversation with him, we ask about the plans from three people who’d also like to be president – of the United States.

Perhaps not surprisingly, the former Republican governor doesn’t have rave reviews for education savings plans from the top three contenders for the 2016 Democratic nomination.

Purdue Athletics

Following a late night trip home after watching the Purdue women’s basketball team defeat Minnesota in overtime Thursday, Purdue athletics director Morgan Burke joins us for our bi-weekly conversation to talk about autonomy in Div. I athletics.

In light of the NCAA’s meeting, what might the new abilities of schools in the so-called “Power 5” conferences mean for Purdue? And what effect might it have on the bottom line?

Jirka Matousek / https://www.flickr.com/photos/jirka_matousek/

Leading up to his State of Union address tonight, President Obama announced he wants to make community college tuition free to encourage more people to get education beyond high school.

It’s a goal many people can get behind, but advocates in Indiana are more excited about the national platform for the conversation than the president’s proposal.

High School Education Is ‘Not Enough’

Keith Cooper / https://www.flickr.com/photos/cooperweb/8363160192

As he asked the school’s Board of Trustees Friday to give preliminary approval to a third year of a tuition freeze, Purdue University President Mitch Daniels indicated holding the line on tuition is causing Purdue donors to be more generous.

Karen Demerly / https://www.flickr.com/photos/kdemerly/5137982135

Leaders at some of Indiana’s other universities say they’re keeping an eye on Purdue’s plan to freeze tuition for a third year, but it’s not impacting them.

The plan will be formally presented to Purdue Trustees Friday morning by President Mitch Daniels, who says he’s not sure how long the school will continue the practice. It keeps Purdue’s overall cost lower than most, if not all, of the state’s private colleges.

Wes Jackson / https://www.flickr.com/photos/boilermakerwes/3608649743/

Purdue University is set to extend its tuition freeze into a third year. President Mitch Daniels, who made the freeze one of his first announcements upon taking the reins of the school, will seek formal approval of the move at Friday’s Board of Trustees meeting.

On Tuesday, the president was quick to say he couldn’t predict how long the policy would last, however.

Ball State approves tuition increase, new fees

Jun 6, 2013

Ball State University is raising tuition by 2% for students next year, which administrators say is in line with most other public universities in the state.

Ball State Vice President for Business Affairs Randy Howard says the Muncie school will raise tuition for undergraduate and graduate students by 2% next year and another 2% the year after that.  In-state full-time undergraduates will pay a little more than $9,000 next year.  Out-of-state undergrads will pay a little more than $24,000.

Ivy Tech officials say a proposed tuition hike will help the statewide community college system make investments in key areas, including more faculty and better equipment. 

The Board of Trustees will vote Thursday on a tuition increase of $20 per credit hour over the next two years – $5 each semester.  That’s a more than 8% increase each year, compared to the Indiana Commission for Higher Education’s 2% recommendation.  And it comes on the heels of a nearly 8% funding increase in the recently passed state budget.

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