U.S. Census Bureau

Civic Health Index Shows Indiana Needs Improvement

Nov 11, 2019

Indiana’s civic health leaves a lot of room for improvement – that’s the conclusion from the fourth edition of the Civic Health Index, unveiled Monday.

Number Of Unisured Hoosiers Ticks Up

Sep 14, 2019

The number of uninsured people in Indiana followed a national trend and increased between 2017 and 2018. About 9,000 fewer Hoosiers have health insurance, the rate went up from 8.2 to 8.3 percent, according to the data from the U.S. Census Bureau. 

Indiana state officials are kickstarting efforts to support the U.S. Census Bureau ahead of next year’s population count.

The U.S. census determines billions of dollars in federal funding for Indiana – including for schools – and education leaders across the state are on a mission to make sure every Hoosier child gets counted in 2020. 

Karen Demerly / https://www.flickr.com/photos/kdemerly/

Tippecanoe County bucked statewide trends last year when it saw more people move in than out. Between 2015 and 2016, the county saw a net population increase of approximately 1,100 people, according to recently-released Census data.

The state as a whole lost more than a thousand people over that same period.

Tippecanoe County, the seventh most populous county in the state, was part of a trend of people migrating from rural to urban areas. 

Nicolas Huk / https://www.flickr.com/photos/128359034@N07/

Indiana’s largest cities and towns—especially around Indianapolis—continue to see a surge in population. A new study of 2015 census data from the Indiana Business Research Center at the Indiana University Kelley School of Business say Indy-area communities dominate a list of the state’s fastest-growing places.

Matt Kinghorn, demographer at the IBRC, says that’s nothing new.

Indiana Business Research Center

More than half of Indiana’s 92 counties experienced a decrease in population in 2015, according to data released by the U.S. Census Bureau Thursday. Most of the remaining counties saw one of the slowest population growths in decades.

Statewide, Indiana added just under 22,000 residents in 2015. That’s Indiana's second-smallest population gain since 1989. 

Matt Kinghorn is an analyst with the Indiana Business Research Center, which analyzed the data. He says this has been a problem for the Midwest for a few decades.