U.S. Department of Agriculture

The U.S. Department of Agriculture released updated numbers Monday showing farmers planted more acres this spring than many private analysts expected. That’s one of several factors driving market prices lower for many farmers’ crops.

It’s hot right now in Indiana and it’s only going to get hotter. The Union of Concerned Scientists released a new report on Tuesday that projects how much extreme heat we can expect as the Earth warms. 

Jae Lee / WBAA News

When U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue announced a few months ago he planned to move the department’s headquarters out of Washington, D.C., Purdue University President Mitch Daniels endorsed the idea every chance he got, and even started his school making some preparations in case Indiana was chosen as the new home.

That honor went instead to Kansas City, Missouri – but was there more Indiana could have done to back up its bid?

U.S. Sen. Todd Young (R-Ind.) told Indiana agriculture groups today he’s asking the U.S. Department of Agriculture for clarity on potential disaster relief for farmers.

Heavy rains and floods delayed planting for many corn and soybean farmers this spring. Federal data show only 84 percent of corn was planted in Indiana as of this week. That’s compared to 100 percent last year.

President Donald Trump boosted tariffs Friday on Chinese imports from 10 to 25 percent. As trade talks continue, U.S. businesses warn the increase will hurt them and consumers.

Indiana farmers anticipate high yields for corn and soybeans. But coupled with retaliatory tariffs against the U.S. from China, Canada and Mexico, farmers’ income could continue to be depressed.

 

East Chicago, Indiana, officials are worried about the future of lead contamination clean up in the city because of actions taken by the Trump Administration Tuesday.

The uncertainty comes after the administration temporarily suspended grants and contracts overseen by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Lee Cannon / https://www.flickr.com/photos/leecannon/6962094774/

Governor Mike Pence wants federal aid for 19 counties affected by flooding that swept through Indiana earlier this summer. 

If granted, the governor’s request would provide FEMA grants to governments and some non-profit organizations in the 19 counties – most of which are in northeast and southeast parts of the state.

The grants would pay up to 75-percent of expenses to, for example, repair damage to roads, bridges and utilities.  It could also be used for debris removal and traffic control. 

Summer Food Programs Start Statewide

Jun 5, 2014
courtesy photo

Summer meal programs are getting underway in 194 Indiana cities.

The programs are designed to ensure kids can get a nutritious breakfast and lunch over the summer when school lunch programs aren‘t operating.

Feeding Indiana‘s Hungry executive director Emily Bryant says participation in the program went up by nearly one-fourth last year.

"Useful to Useable" effort making progress

Feb 4, 2013

Researchers at Purdue and nine other universities are seeing progress in their effort to help farmers deal with changes to climate.

The first phase of developing models for different scenarios and surveying farmers and those who provide them services is complete. The team is now trying to figure out the best way to convey the information to producers.

Dr. Linda Prokopy, associate professor in Purdue’s Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, is involved with the program and heading up the effort on the West Lafayette campus.

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