USDA

Brock Turner / WFIU/WTIU News

Indiana farm loan delinquencies were down slightly last month compared to the same time last year. But, that doesn’t mean farmers aren’t worried about their financial health.

Indiana’s United States Department of Agriculture Farm Service Office says they are currently lending to about 1,500 farmers, and just shy of 1 percent of them are behind on their loans.

Steve Brown is Indiana’s Farm Service Agency Executive Director. He says it will take some time for farmers to feel the impacts of delayed planting this spring.

Gov. Eric Holcomb asked the United States Department of Agriculture Friday to designate 88 counties as disaster zones. To be able to request a county be designated an agricultural disaster area, at least 30 percent of a single crop must be damaged or lost.

Steve Burns / WTIU/WFIU News

 

Farmers who claim preventative plant coverage on their crops likely won’t be getting aid from President Trump’s tariff payments.

Preventative plant coverage is for farmers who are not able to get a crop in the ground.  Much like other types of insurance, it allows farmers to purchase a level of coverage that protects them against losses. Farmers have only planted a third of Indiana’s corn so far this year, compared to 94 percent this time last year.  

Cormo USA Chooses Indiana For First U.S. Plant

May 8, 2019

An agriculture technology company coming to Indiana aims to develop a new market for farm waste. The business plans to break ground this summer on its first U.S. location.

Joshua Duffy / https://www.flickr.com/photos/joshduffyphoto/7283981926

Last week’s heavy rainfall has added more delays to Indiana’s corn harvest.

As of this week, 70-percent of the state’s corn has been harvested – that’s compared to 85-percent at this time last year. That’s even though, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, wet conditions have forced farmers to focus on corn instead of completing soybean harvests.

Grants Boost Nonprofit Food Insecurity Work

Oct 16, 2017

Thirty-seven Hoosier organizations that tackle food insecurity are being awarded grants today to mark World Food Day.

The latest report from the USDA shows that 15 percent of families in Indiana struggle to provide enough food, higher than the national average.

The Glick Philanthropies Feeding Those in Need program awarded funds to non-profits groups in communities across Indiana that address this problem.

Indiana’s top agricultural official will become the nation’s first undersecretary for foreign agricultural trade.

The U.S. Senate confirmed Ted McKinney to the newly-created Department of Agriculture post Tuesday.

In a statement, USDA secretary Sonny Perdue says McKinney will “wake up every morning seeking to sell more American agricultural products in foreign markets.”

U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue wrapped up a Midwest road trip at the Indiana State Fair Tuesday.

Perdue met in private with state lawmakers about their goals for the 2018 Farm Bill reauthorization.

That’s the $800 billion package of laws governing the nation’s agricultural and nutritional assistance programs.

Indiana’s top agriculture official has been tapped to oversee global farm trade for the Trump administration.

Indiana Department of Agriculture director Ted McKinney now faces a Senate confirmation to become the USDA’s first-ever trade undersecretary.

He says he’s grateful for the support he’s received since getting the news.

“I am so honored to be nominated by the president, and I look forward to serving if confirmed,” McKinney says.

Uneven, wet weather is complicating the growing season for Indiana farmers.

There’s much more cash cropland this week that has too much moisture in its soil than at this time last year, according to the USDA’s latest crop progress report.

And the federal agency says the current condition of Indiana’s corn and soybeans isn’t as good as it was a year ago.

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