utilities

Rebecca Thiele / IPB News

The NAACP is offering up to $300 for African American residents struggling to pay their energy bills due to COVID-19. This comes about a week after the state allowed utilities to resume disconnections for unpaid bills.

(Ildar Sagdejev/Wikimedia Commons)

UPDATE: On Wednesday, the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission ordered state-regulated utilities to offer payment plans of at least six months for their customers. Late fees, disconnection fees and reconnection fees have also been suspended until Oct. 12. 

Last week, Gov. Eric Holcomb said the state has no plans to further extend a ban on utility shutoffs during the COVID-19 crisis. But more than 11 percent of Hoosiers are still unemployed and cases are going up.

(Courtesy of the State of Indiana)

Hoosiers whose jobs were affected by COVID-19 could get access to some help with utility costs.

Those who lost their jobs – or had hours significantly cut back – can receive up to $350 in a one-time benefit to pay their utility bills.

(Ildar Sagdejev/Wikimedia Commons)

 

The state plans to look into how the pandemic has affected Indiana utilities and their customers. This comes just days after Gov. Eric Holcomb extended the moratorium on utility disconnections for unpaid bills by another month. 

Rebecca Thiele / IPB News

 

Utility companies will soon be allowed to resume disconnections for unpaid bills. The state’s consumer advocate group is asking the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission to continue protections for people unemployed due to the COVID-19 crisis. 

Among other things, the group wants the IURC to order utilities to continue suspending disconnections past June 4 — the date the governor’s moratorium on disconnections lifts.

(Portland General Electric)

 

Several gas and electric utilities in Indiana are seeking financial relief due to COVID-19. But consumer advocates worry this could make energy bills even higher for people who are currently struggling to pay bills during the crisis. 

Rep. Ed Soliday (R-Valparaiso) wants a two-year moratorium on new power plants while the legislature and utility regulators help craft a comprehensive energy plan for the state. (Lauren Chapman/IPB News)
Brandon Smith

Republicans in a House committee this week voted to largely halt new power plants in Indiana for the next two years.

The moratorium’s architect says he wants to ensure the state’s energy future is balanced.

A controversial bill moving through the state Senate would make changes to a law that lets utilities more quickly recover the costs of certain projects from ratepayers. It involves the Transmission, Distribution, and Storage Improvement Charge or TDSIC. 

City of Frankfort

It’s been a year of turmoil for Frankfort city government.

The State Board of Accounts is investigating possible embezzlement by a former parks director.

The city has had to raise rates for both its electric service and water utility. And now a water filtration plant either needs a costly retrofit or a funeral.

And the city continues to struggle with the same sorts of drug problems many Indiana towns have – to the point where the local high school is planning random drug testing.

City of West Lafayette

A couple weeks ago, when Indiana American Water Company announced its water needed treatment for possible contamination, it wasn’t just the water that started boiling – so, too did West Lafayette Mayor John Dennis’s blood.

On this week’s Ask The Mayor program, we chat with Mayor Dennis about whether the anger about not being able to control such situations might lead to the city controlling its own utilities.

We talk infrastructure on this week's show – there’s more than enough road construction to go around.