Wally Tyner

The U.S.-China trade war continues with President Donald Trump threatening to place 25 percent tariffs on more Chinese imports. However, businesses and economist warn consumers will be the ones paying.

(wuestenigel/Flickr)
Samantha Horton

Retailers say that they can’t absorb the extra costs from the Trump administration’s increased tariffs on billions of dollars in Chinese imports. Now consumers can expect to see price increases when shopping.

One way to meet the goals set out by the Paris Agreement on climate change is carbon sequestration  – capturing and storing carbon in the atmosphere. A recent study including Purdue University researchers finds forests are an efficient way to do that – but with limits.

Indiana Farmer Creates Corn Maze Thanking Trump For E15

Oct 25, 2018
Benton County Farmer Bruce Buchanan harvests corn to create the message "Thanks Mr. Trump For E15" into his field. (Photo provided by Paige Britton and Barry Tolen)
Samantha Horton

One Indiana farmer found a special way to thank President Donald Trump after he announced earlier this month E15, gasoline blended with ethanol, will be sold year-round.

Benton County corn farmer Bruce Buchanan farms about 6,000 acres with his son and recently drew national attention when he got some help and carved the message “Thanks Mr. Trump For E15” into his field.

Fifth generation Elkhart County farmer Mike Morehouse comes from a family that’s been working the land for more than 150 years. Growing corn and soybeans, he recently bought a new grain bin to store his corn.

Indiana Farmers Feeling Impact Of Tariffs, Fear More

Apr 9, 2018
Steve Burns / WTIU

 

All of the talk about a possible trade war with China has a lot of Hoosiers worried – especially farmers.

China implemented tariffs this week on more than 120 goods from the United States, including pork products. Indiana is the fifth leading pork producer in the country, so farmers here will feel the impact.

Flooding From Harvey Causes Indiana Gas Price Spike

Sep 1, 2017
Brian Herzog / https://www.flickr.com/photos/herzogbr/

Hurricane Harvey has shut down oil refineries at the Gulf of Mexico that account for 20-percent of the nation’s total gasoline supply -- and that's forcing Indiana drivers to pay more at the pump.

Hoosiers get a lot of their gasoline from Northwest Indiana’s Whiting Refinery and from facilities in Illinois, but a portion also comes from the Gulf Coast.

Purdue University agricultural economist Wally Tyner says rainfall during Hurricane Harvey lasted much longer than expected, which has flooded refineries and created a shortage.

Mike Mozart / flickr.com/photos/jeepersmedia/14319904578

A Purdue agricultural economist is projecting gasoline prices will remain low this summer.

Wally Tyner says there’s usually a bump in price for the summer months, but an industry surplus has kept crude oil around $50 a barrel.

“What that did is it gave the U.S. shale oil producers enough profit margin to increase their production,” he says. “Their costs have fallen 30-percent in the last three years.”

Tyner says the increase in shale oil production – now up to 600,000 barrels a day – should balance out OPEC’s 1.2 million barrel cut by the end of the year.

Seth Anderson / https://www.flickr.com/photos/swanksalot/271337214

Indiana farmers and ethanol producers are in limbo as they wait for the Environmental Protection Agency to decide how much of the biofuel should be blended into the nation’s gasoline.

Indiana is one of the largest ethanol producers in the U.S. And every year, thanks to a law known as the Renewable Fuel Standard, the EPA decides on how much of that ethanol gets mixed with gasoline.

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

High overhead CityBus’s Lafayette headquarters tower three wind turbines, which whir almost melodically on this blustery winter day.

They’re the most visible sign of the corporation’s push to be more environmentally friendly.

But on the ground, there’s a different whirring sound that foretells of the newest such effort -- a generator helps run power tools and a radio playing country music as half a dozen workmen install a natural gas pumping station.

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