Indiana Farm Bureau

(Wikimedia Commons)
Lauren Chapman

Thursday night at the stroke of midnight, speculations became reality when the U.S.-imposed tariffs on $34 billion worth of Chinese goods.

U.S. Senate Takes Up Farm Bill After House Bill Fails

Jun 12, 2018
Produce from local farmers is unloaded at the Lafayette-based Food Finders. (FILE PHOTO: Jill Sheridan/IPB News)
Lauren Chapman

After the farm bill failed in the U.S. House last month, it’s the Senate’s turn to take the legislation up. Wednesday's Senate hearing is unlikely to be as controversial. 

(WFIU/WTIU News)

 

 

President Trump directed trade officials Thursday to look into rejoining negotiations for a major trade deal with eleven Pacific Rim countries. And, experts say it could be good news for Indiana.

Soil Moisture Concerns Farmers Preparing To Plant Crops

Apr 11, 2018

Indiana farmers are becoming concerned that recent precipitation – both rain and snow – will delay this year’s planting date.

Southern Indiana farmers should be out in field by now preparing for planting but the damp soil is postponing operations. Indiana Farm Bureau spokesman Bob White says the longer the delay, the greater the concern.

Indiana Farmers Feeling Impact Of Tariffs, Fear More

Apr 9, 2018
Steve Burns / WTIU

 

All of the talk about a possible trade war with China has a lot of Hoosiers worried – especially farmers.

China implemented tariffs this week on more than 120 goods from the United States, including pork products. Indiana is the fifth leading pork producer in the country, so farmers here will feel the impact.

A House committee cautiously began debate Tuesday on what the committee chair calls “a touchy subject” – township government reform.

The legislation would force townships with less than 1,200 people to merge with an adjacent township by 2023. That mandate would eliminate about 1,200 elected officials.

Indiana Township Association President Debbie Driscoll says her organization supports such reform.

Indiana’s top agriculture official has been tapped to oversee global farm trade for the Trump administration.

Indiana Department of Agriculture director Ted McKinney now faces a Senate confirmation to become the USDA’s first-ever trade undersecretary.

He says he’s grateful for the support he’s received since getting the news.

“I am so honored to be nominated by the president, and I look forward to serving if confirmed,” McKinney says.

The cost of an Independence Day picnic’s worth of groceries continued to drop in Indiana this year, as part of a race to the bottom in the prices of competing food products.

The Indiana Farm Bureau tracks the cost of different sets of grocery items throughout the year. For July Fourth, it’s a 10-person barbecue – hot dogs, hamburgers and ribs, watermelon and other sides, plus drinks and condiments.

It all costs $51.50 this year, down 35 cents from last year and about 75 cents from 2014.

Uneven, wet weather is complicating the growing season for Indiana farmers.

There’s much more cash cropland this week that has too much moisture in its soil than at this time last year, according to the USDA’s latest crop progress report.

And the federal agency says the current condition of Indiana’s corn and soybeans isn’t as good as it was a year ago.

The $130 billion merger between Dow and DuPont received conditional federal approval Thursday.

The companies still have to address areas where the Department of Justice says they’ll have too big a market share, but those aren’t the areas that have Indiana farmers worried.

In approving the merger, the DOJ says Dow and DuPont have to relinquish control of a few assets – a chemical plant in Texas for Dow, and two of DuPont’s insecticide and herbicide brands.

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