AARP

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changingaging.org

A small house and a big idea are coming to the University of Southern Indiana.

The university announced it’s building a small, modular home to demonstrate how the tiny housing model could make independent living accessible for people of all ages and abilities.

Older Hoosiers Express Concerns Over Health Bill

Jun 29, 2017

Nearly 14,000 callers from around Indiana took part in a telephone town hall about the Senate health care bill with U.S. Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.). The call was organized by AARP Indiana, which strongly opposes the measure.

Their opposition to the health care reform bill stems from worries about increased costs and reduced benefits.

Donnelly says he has the same concerns.

A Shelbyville state representative is sponsoring legislation that aims to help Hoosiers save for retirement.

Rep. Sean Eberhart says upwards of 50-percent of all Hoosier workers don't have access to employer-sponsored retirement savings plans.

That's why he says he's sponsoring the "HERO," or Hoosier Employee Retirement Options, bill during the upcoming session of the Indiana General Assembly.

Scorecard: Much Improvement Needed in Caring for Aging Hoosiers

Jun 25, 2014
JC Munt/morguefile

Indiana has seen efforts in recent years to improve the long-term care needs of older Hoosiers, but the findings of a new analysis suggest a lot more could be done.

AARP released a national scorecard by state on long-term services available for seniors and their families, and state legislative director Ambre Marr said Indiana ranks 47th overall.

Rob Ketcherside / https://www.flickr.com/photos/tigerzombie/3874088349

A report from the National Complete Streets Coalition ranks Indiana 23rd worst in the country for pedestrian fatalities.  The cause, it says, is poor street design.  Too often, communities plan roads to benefit drivers without considering pedestrians or cyclists. 

AARP-Indiana State Director June Lyle says the problem disproportionately affects the elderly.  She says older Hoosiers won’t have the option of continuing to live in their homes if communities don’t start considering all road users when building new roads or upgrading existing ones.