CAFOs

Annie Ropeik / File Photo

A requested permit to open a confined feeding operation, or CFO, has some residents in Montgomery County concerned.

The permit was submitted by Bowlder Ridge LLC. Documents from the Indiana Department of Environmental Management say the request, submitted May 21, is for a farm of 8,800 hogs near the small town of Linden.

Monty Eldridge, a county resident who lives near the proposed site, says he received a notice from IDEM about the requested permit. He says he’s gone door to door to speak with other residents.

CAFOs off Route 25 in Tippecanoe County. (FILE PHOTO: Annie Ropeik/IPB News)
Lauren Chapman

Farmers officially don’t have to report toxic emissions from animal waste and other pollutants. On Tuesday, the Environmental Protection Agency solidified a rule on that after more than a decade of debate. It could have implications for Hoosiers living near confined animal feeding operations or CAFOs  

Delaware County Revokes Permit For CAFO

Jul 2, 2018

A Delaware County man will no longer be allowed to open a farm with more than 10,000 hogs. Late last week, the county rejected Rhett Light’s permit for a concentrated animal feeding operation or CAFO. It was approved by the county in May. 

Bill To Regulate Factory Farms Dead For 2018 Session

Jan 26, 2018

House Environmental Affairs Committee Chair Dave Wolkins decided this week not to hear a bill this session that deals with confined animal feeding operations, or CAFOs.

A legislative study committee this week will wrap up its examination of the state’s confined animal feeding operations — barns that feed hundreds to thousands of animals, such as pigs, cows and chickens.

The hearings have drawn impassioned testimony from supporters and opponents alike. Many crop farmers say the extra income from CAFOs helps keep family farms alive. But opponents say CAFOs can pollute waterways and emit a debilitating odor.

Committee chair Sen. Sue Glick (R-LaGrange) says there is a place for large-scale animal agriculture in Indiana.

Ag Study Committee Talks CAFOs

Aug 29, 2017

In a meeting of the agriculture and natural resources study committee that featured very little new information, state lawmakers Tuesday heard from experts and state regulators on animal agriculture and concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs).

Committee members heard an overview of the state’s CAFO permitting process from the Indiana Department of Environmental Management.

And CAFO legislation expert Carolyn Orr told legislators big farm operations aren’t necessarily bad ones.

Half a dozen homeowners in rural Bartholomew County will get to pay less in property taxes because they live near concentrated animal feeding operations, or CAFOs.

The decision comes about a year after the families in the town of Hope appealed to the county about the impact of large hog farms on their home values.

After the county denied their requests in March, the neighbors appealed the case to the State Board of Tax Review.

Purdue University researchers are releasing new findings about how Indiana counties regulate big livestock farms, in hopes of determining what rules work best to help farmers get along with their neighbors.

Paul Ebner’s team at Purdue has spent years mapping out the wide range of zoning rules counties use to regulate confined animal feeding operations – known as CFOs – and their bigger, more concentrated counterparts, called CAFOs.

 

Rural homeowners in Bartholomew County say a big, nearby hog farm – a concentrated animal feeding operation, or CAFO – is hurting their property values.

The county denied their bid to lower the CAFO neighbors’ property taxes, and argued the issue is too complex to codify, while residents say officials are just worried about politics and money.

A battle over the impact of a big hog farm on rural home values in Bartholomew County will go before the Indiana Board of Tax Review – but it will not lead to the broader regulatory changes some residents had hoped for.

On Tuesday, county officials denied individual property tax appeals from a group of neighbors who live near a concentrated animal feeding operation, or CAFO, in the town of Hope.

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