cancer

Tyler Trent's Cells Lead To Groundbreaking Therapy

Jan 17, 2020

Researchers at Indiana University have found a new therapy that significantly slows tumor growth in some cells. It was developed from cells donated by Tyler Trent, a Purdue University student with bone cancer who died last year.

Researchers from Indiana have found a possible way to better deliver cancer drugs to tumors in the brain. The challenge in delivery lies in what’s called the blood-brain barrier.

A federal grant to an Indiana researcher will fund the study of a type of therapy for late-stage cancer patients that focuses on improving quality of life. 

Cancer Wellness Project Launches In Indiana

Jul 23, 2019

Cancer survivors in Indiana can now turn to a new program for wellness services beyond their treatment. The initiative will also provide research opportunities.

Several Franklin residents say they were never told about cancer-causing chemicals at the Amphenol industrial site. The Environmental Protection Agency’s internal watchdog, the Office of Inspector General, took resident’s comments Wednesday night. 

Students will be able to return to Needham and Webb elementary schools in Franklin on Monday after the school district determined the buildings are safe.

(Courtesy of American Cancer Society)
Lauren Chapman

A new initiative launched in Indiana will support women-led cancer research.

More women are entering the science field but still struggle to land in leadership positions. The new program from the American Cancer Society in Indiana will raise funds and awareness.  

Swiss pharmaceutical giant Novartis announced plans to acquire West Lafayette-based Endocyte for $2.1 billion.

263cf7ea-bd16-4a25-82f5-b37827746965
Lauren Bavis/Side Effects Public Media

Steve Dillman thinks he can trace his prostate cancer back to August 1, 1985.

Experts looking for cancer-causing chemicals in Franklin say, so far, they don’t see a widespread problem in the city. But recent sampling results show very high levels in some tests, indicating more investigation is needed. 

Pages