dementia

The state is leading a new push to educate first responders in Indiana about dementia. It aims to improve the response of those on the front lines of emergency calls.

Jill Sheridan / IPB News

The search for pharmaceutical treatments for Alzheimer’s and dementia has so far been unsuccessful, but a new drug discovery center aims to change that.

The National Institutes of Health is gifting $36 million to fund the new center, one of two to be established nationwide.  The Indiana University School of Medicine will partner with Purdue University to develop research tools and technologies to identify new treatment options.

Alan Palkowitz will lead the center.  He was previously the vice president of discovery chemistry research at Eli Lilly.

A team of Indiana researchers received a national grant to study the use of an app aimed at older patients.  The tool is designed to help patients avoid drugs linked to dementia.

Dementia Awareness Event Explores Music Therapy

May 15, 2019
Tim Brimmer (right) takes part in a panel about dementia and music therapy. (Jill Sheridan/IPB News)
Jill Sheridan

At a panel discussion held during “Memory Day” at Conner Prairie museum in Fishers, Butler University Professor Tim Brimmer talked about his research that has focused on the use of music for Alzheimer’s and dementia patients.  

Indiana University research identified a tiny molecule that may signal the presence of some types of dementia. Researchers say this could be a first step to developing an early test for Alzheimer’s.

Unlike regular "messenger RNA," which direct cells to produce specific proteins, microRNA plays a regulatory role, increasing or decreasing the number of proteins that messenger RNAs encode. 

Purdue University researchers Jean-Christophe “Chris” Rochet and Dr. Riyi Shi say their discovery of a key factor in the development of Parkinson’s disease could lead to new therapies. (Photo courtesy of Alex Kumar/Purdue University)
Jill Sheridan

Purdue researchers have discovered how a molecule plays into the development of Parkinson’s disease. The findings point to treatment that’s already on the market as well as new biomarkers.

The research focuses on a compound called acrolein that acts as a neuro-toxin, killing brain cells.  Extensive damage of these cells can result in Parkinson’s disease.

Brain Training Linked To Reduced Dementia Risk

Nov 28, 2017

A long-term study found cognitive training may reduce dementia cases and Indiana researchers were involved in this first of its kind analysis.

The Advanced Cognitive Training in Vital Elderly or ACTIVE study observed almost 3000 older adults in different types of cognitive training. Researchers set out to determine if cognitive training improves functions like memory and problem solving.

Indiana University School of Medicine professor, Dr. Fred Unverzagt, says this leads to further analysis.

Neil Conway / https://www.flickr.com/photos/neilconway/

Eli Lilly has announced a promising drug that would have become the first disease-modifying treatment for Alzheimer’s disease has failed a late-stage clinical trial.

The results come as a devastating blow for Indianapolis-based Lilly, which had sunk decades of research and hundreds of thousands of dollars into the medication, called solanezumab, or “sola.”

The pharmaceutical world had held its breath awaiting the results of the final-stage study, which were expected to be released in early December.

Bloomington Symphony Orchestra

More than 110,000 Hoosiers suffer from some form of dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease. 

There's currently a growing trend to use more personalized therapy options for patients.

In Indianapolis, a handful of Butler University students work with residents who have Alzheimer's and dementia at an assisted living facility.

They are crafting a personalized therapeutic tool – a music playlist.

Ninety-one-year-old Bessie Mays talks about growing up in Nashville, Tennessee. 

Report: 1-in-60 Hoosiers Has Alzheimer's

Apr 3, 2015
Alzheimer's Association

A new report shows approximately 1 of every 60 Hoosiers suffers from Alzheimer’s disease.

Statistics from the 2015 Alzheimer‘s Disease Facts and Figures report 110,000 Hoosiers currently have the disease and an estimated 2,100 Hoosiers die from it every year.

Also, while the national rates for HIV, breast cancer, heart disease and stroke have gone down since 2000, the rate of Alzheimer’s disease is up more than 70-percent.