health insurance

Two Indiana Insurers Left Standing On Healthcare.gov Exchange

Jun 22, 2017
e42ac1a0-e71d-4f78-8681-10a2d0791acc
Sarah Fentem

Only two health insurers will offer plans next year on Indiana’s Affordable Care Act exchange, according to proposed rate increases posted by the Indiana Department of Insurance posted Thursday. That’s down from four insurers this year and seven in 2016.

Indiana health insurers will file their 2018 rates this week for the Affordable Care Act (ACA) marketplace but uncertainty about the future of health care reform may play into price and availability for the roughly 150,000 Hoosiers in the system.

Beverly Knight is self-employed. She was able to have a double knee-surgery because she is covered under the ACA.  She’s worried about rate hikes.

“If President Trump’s plan to sabotage the ACA succeeds, and premiums skyrocket as many expect, hundreds of Hoosier families, including mine, will be devastated,” Knight says.

Friday marked the official end to Indianapolis-based Anthem’s bid to merge with Cigna, and the second time in recent months a major health insurance merger has failed.

It underscores the uphill regulatory battle that big health insurers face in trying to join forces.

Anti-trust officials blocked mergers between Humana and Aetna, and Anthem and Cigna this year. Those four have something in common: they’re among their industry’s biggest, top-earning companies.

A merger between Indianapolis-based Anthem and fellow health insurance giant Cigna is officially dead – and Anthem says it won’t pay Cigna a break-up fee.

Anthem killed the $54 billion deal Friday after a failed bid to keep Delaware-based Cigna at the bargaining table.

Katherine Peraza poses with her her 3-month-old son. (Jill Sheridan/IPB News)
(Jill Sheridan/IPB News)
Sonny Abesamis / https://www.flickr.com/photos/enerva/

A newly-released report from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office predicts 24 million people will lose insurance coverage if the proposed GOP Obamacare replacement passes.

That could have an effect on more than 500,000 Hoosiers.

Washington State House Republicans / https://www.flickr.com/photos/wahousegop/

The House Republicans’ replacement plan for the Affordable Care Act—otherwise known as Obamacare—would gradually phase out enrollment in Medicaid expansion programs such as Indiana’s Healthy Indiana Plan.

The bill—released earlier this week—aims to let the expansions remain for another three years. Starting in 2020, enrollment would “freeze,” and no new enrollees would be able to join, which would mean the program would gradually lose members.

Approximately 250 thousand people currently have coverage through HIP 2.0.

Michael Havens / https://www.flickr.com/photos/128733321@N05/

Almost half of the 95,000 members enrolled in the state’s Hoosier Care Connect health care program will need to switch their plans this month after one of the three companies offering coverage makes its exit.

MDWise, an Indianapolis-based company, announced late last month the company was dropping out of the program.

Leaders at MDWise contend it’s not financially feasible to renew a contract with the state, even though Indiana Family and Social Services Administration spokesman Jim Gavin says the administration’s actuary says the rates are fair.

Matt Chaney / https://www.flickr.com/photos/vcucns/

Just days after a federal judge shut down a $54 billion merger between health insurers Anthem and Cigna on anti-competitive grounds, a Valentine’s Day move by Connecticut’s Cigna seeks to dump the Indianapolis-based company once and for all.

 

Cigna officials announced Tuesday they had sued Anthem in a Delaware court seeking a judge’s affirmation that the company had lawfully ducked out of the merger agreement, and that Anthem couldn’t extend the merger’s expiration date.

 

Jim Grey / https://www.flickr.com/photos/mobilene/

If Indianapolis-based insurance company Anthem wants to appeal a federal judge’s decision scrapping the company’s upcoming merger with fellow insurer Cigna, it may have a short time window in which to do so.

While the U.S. Justice Department’s suit contained many anti-competitive claims against the merger, Wednesday’s decision only concerns competition in one market — big companies with more than 5,000 employees. In this market, health insurers often offer so-called “Administrative Services Only” contracts, with the companies paying for actual services themselves.

Pages