health insurance

Sonny Abesamis / https://www.flickr.com/photos/enerva/

A newly-released report from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office predicts 24 million people will lose insurance coverage if the proposed GOP Obamacare replacement passes.

That could have an effect on more than 500,000 Hoosiers.

Washington State House Republicans / https://www.flickr.com/photos/wahousegop/

The House Republicans’ replacement plan for the Affordable Care Act—otherwise known as Obamacare—would gradually phase out enrollment in Medicaid expansion programs such as Indiana’s Healthy Indiana Plan.

The bill—released earlier this week—aims to let the expansions remain for another three years. Starting in 2020, enrollment would “freeze,” and no new enrollees would be able to join, which would mean the program would gradually lose members.

Approximately 250 thousand people currently have coverage through HIP 2.0.

Michael Havens / https://www.flickr.com/photos/128733321@N05/

Almost half of the 95,000 members enrolled in the state’s Hoosier Care Connect health care program will need to switch their plans this month after one of the three companies offering coverage makes its exit.

MDWise, an Indianapolis-based company, announced late last month the company was dropping out of the program.

Leaders at MDWise contend it’s not financially feasible to renew a contract with the state, even though Indiana Family and Social Services Administration spokesman Jim Gavin says the administration’s actuary says the rates are fair.

Matt Chaney / https://www.flickr.com/photos/vcucns/

Just days after a federal judge shut down a $54 billion merger between health insurers Anthem and Cigna on anti-competitive grounds, a Valentine’s Day move by Connecticut’s Cigna seeks to dump the Indianapolis-based company once and for all.

 

Cigna officials announced Tuesday they had sued Anthem in a Delaware court seeking a judge’s affirmation that the company had lawfully ducked out of the merger agreement, and that Anthem couldn’t extend the merger’s expiration date.

 

Jim Grey / https://www.flickr.com/photos/mobilene/

If Indianapolis-based insurance company Anthem wants to appeal a federal judge’s decision scrapping the company’s upcoming merger with fellow insurer Cigna, it may have a short time window in which to do so.

While the U.S. Justice Department’s suit contained many anti-competitive claims against the merger, Wednesday’s decision only concerns competition in one market — big companies with more than 5,000 employees. In this market, health insurers often offer so-called “Administrative Services Only” contracts, with the companies paying for actual services themselves.

Jim Nix / https://www.flickr.com/photos/jimnix/6168273244

Approximately 1,000 Hoosiers showed up in Indianapolis Sunday to protest congressional efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act. The rally was organized by a coalition of local and state-wide organizations, including Planned Parenthood, the Indiana Democratic Party and the state chapter of the Democratic Socialists of America.

Rallies across the U.S. were spurred in part by Senator Bernie Sanders (who was not in attendance at the Indianapolis event).

Wikimedia Commons / https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Medicine#/media/File:Stress_test.jpg

Even though many Hoosiers will be facing increased prices and fewer options on the Affordable Care Act’s federal health insurance exchange next year, Indiana’s enrollment for 2017 is still up by more than 9 thousand people.

According to figures released Wednesday by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, more than 119 thousand Hoosiers have signed up for insurance on healthcare.gov for coverage beginning January 1, a nearly 9 percent increase.

https://www.healthcare.gov/

Open enrollment on the Affordable Care Act exchange begins Nov. 1. But how much Hoosiers will pay on the ACA marketplace depends on many factors — including whom is asked. 

Last week the Obama administration announced new rates on the federal marketplace will rise an average of 22 percent nationwide. That reported increase, though, is only based on one benchmark Silver plan, which is used to calculate federal subsidies.

Presidencia de la República Mexicana / https://www.flickr.com/photos/presidenciamx/

The Indiana Supreme Court has declined to take up a case that questioned whether an uninsured Fort Wayne man was entitled to information about hospital rates for other, insured patients.

In 2013, uninsured Goshen resident Thomas Frost stayed at Parkview Hospital in Fort Wayne for weeks after being seriously injured in a 2013 motorcycle accident. After Frost was discharged, Parkview said he owed nearly $630 thousand in hospital fees.

Alex E. Proimos / https://www.flickr.com/photos/proimos/

Indiana University Health Plans, which provides insurance to approximately 23,000 Hoosiers, is the latest company to announce it won’t be offering coverage through the Affordable Care Act exchange in 2017.

Earlier this year, United Healthcare announced it was exiting Indiana’s individual marketplace, and last month, Fort Wayne-based Physicians Health Plan of Northern Indiana followed suit.

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