potholes

Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

As two new water slides go in and as the City of Lafayette prepares to rebuild Loeb Stadium, redevelopment is moving down Main Street toward the Five Points intersection. Mayor Tony Roswarski has said it’ll likely be several more years until a proposed plan for a Five Points overhaul begins in earnest – and it’s a spot that needs some TLC, to be sure.

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we take a look at the surrounding homes, and whether gentrification might be a necessity if the city truly hopes to clean up Five Points.

City of Frankfort

One of the main reasons Frankfort city councilman Lewis Wheeler is running against incumbent Chris McBarnes in this year’s Republican mayoral primary is a difference of opinion in how the city spends its money on the way toward possible economic development.

This week on WBAA’s Ask The Mayor, we quiz Mayor McBarnes about why he’s hired a new Community Development Director, and how her job might be different than what the Chamber of Commerce has already been doing.

When you drive over a pothole in your neighborhood, you can report it to the city and hope they come fix it soon – or you can fix it yourself. At least, that’s what one Indianapolis man has been doing this year.

Michael Warren’s project, which he calls Open Source roads, reveals a lot about the different ways residents and governments try to care for their communities.

Road construction season is underway, and after state lawmakers allocated more money for local roads, House Speaker Brian Bosma says communities should see a big season.

“We want them to start smelling asphalt in July,” Bosma said after unveiling the road funding package in April.

Indiana’s local communities will receive at least $200 million for roads and bridges in the state’s new infrastructure funding package.

City of Lafayette

For months, Mayor Tony Roswarski has tried to balance perceptions of an increase in drug crime in Lafayette with sunnier statements of economic development and improvements to quality of life.

But when 2015 crime stats were announced last week, a nearly 50-percent increase in assaults brought the problem into sharp relief.

Also on this week’s show, the city has released a new smartphone app. Now, residents can geotag potholes on their street that need fixing.