utility rates

A consumer advocate group says Indiana Michigan Power doesn’t need most of its proposed $172 million rate increase. Under I&M’s proposal, customers’ monthly bills would go up by more than 11 percent — an increase of about $21 for a typical resident. 

Indiana American Water’s 1.3 million residential customers can expect to pay about an extra $2.41 per month if the state approves a rate increase. But that’s less than half as much as the utility originally requested. 

A controversial bill moving through the state Senate would make changes to a law that lets utilities more quickly recover the costs of certain projects from ratepayers. It involves the Transmission, Distribution, and Storage Improvement Charge or TDSIC. 

A new study shows hate crimes laws often aren’t utilized. House lawmakers change a school bus safety bill. And a Senate panel advances a bill to loosen restrictions on adoption advertising.

Here’s what you might have missed this week at the Statehouse.

Hate Crimes Research

OUCC: NIPSCO Doesn't Need To Raise Residents' Rates

Feb 26, 2019

A northern Indiana utility wants to raise residents' rates while giving its industrial customers the ability to access lower market prices. But a state utility consumer advocate says NIPSCO doesn’t need the rate hike.

(Indianapolis Power & Light)
Lauren Chapman

A state agency representing utility customers says Indianapolis Power & Light doesn’t need a $96 million rate hike. The agency has received more than 2,700 comments from customers opposing the proposed increase. 

City of Frankfort

The City of Frankfort is touting its ranking as the 50th safest city in Indiana.

But how do the calculations from the National Council for Home Safety and Security line up with the city's own data which showed a 12 percent increase in overall drug violation arrests and a 47 percent increase in drunk driving arrests in 2016?

Also, can the city's focus on downtown revitalization projects, such as a new public open space alongside the proposed Nickel Plate Flats apartments, stimulate needed improvements in other neighborhoods?

Courtesy Crawfordsville Mayor's Office

It’s fairly common for city-owned utility companies to ask for rate increases.

Most cases are like Crawfordsville’s – the city asks for the rate hike because it needs money for new construction or rehabilitation of existing property.

But what happens when those projects are completed? Today on Ask The Mayor, we ask Crawfordsville’s Todd Barton if those costs will ever go back down.

Also on today’s show: Like Frankfort, Crawfordsville is struggling with a golf course that regularly loses money.