Environmental Protection Agency

As coal plants shut down in Indiana, the state gets less money from the air permit fees that companies pay to put pollution in the air. That means fewer dollars are going to the people and equipment needed to run the state’s air permitting program. 

EPA Proposes Changes To Regulations On Coal Ash Use

Jul 31, 2019

The Environmental Protection Agency is proposing even more changes to rules regarding coal ash. This week the agency announced plans to get rid of the limit for how much coal ash utilities can dump on land for certain uses. 

The Environmental Protection Agency may be misleading potential homebuyers about contamination in Franklin. That’s according to an alert issued Thursday by the EPA's internal watchdog, the Office of Inspector General. 

Residents at East Chicago, Indiana’s toxic Superfund site got an opportunity Wednesday to voice their concerns on the Environmental Protection Agency communication about health risks. 

The Environmental Protection Agency’s internal watchdog will host a listening session in East Chicago, Indiana, Wednesday on the group’s communication to residents and officials. 

The Environmental Protection Agency has officially replaced an Obama-era rule that would have set limits on air pollution from coal-fired power plants. The Trump administration says the Clean Power Plan — which never went into effect — was an overreach of the EPA’s power. 

EPA To Franklin Residents: 'We'll Do Better'

Jun 6, 2019

The Environmental Protection Agency is taking steps to improve communication with Franklin residents. People living in Franklin believe that toxic chemicals coming from the old Amphenol industrial site may be causing child cancers in the area. 

The Environmental Protection Agency is offering $14 million to fund projects that help reduce harmful runoff into Great Lakes waterways through the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative. That includes green infrastructure, farmer-led outreach and education, manure management on farms, and a market-based approach called “water quality trading.” 

A plume of cancer-causing chemicals in drinking water wells in Logansport has been added to the Environmental Protection Agency’s Superfund National Priorities List. The list helps prioritize some of the most contaminated sites in the country and makes them eligible for federal cleanup funding. 

Several Franklin residents say they were never told about cancer-causing chemicals at the Amphenol industrial site. The Environmental Protection Agency’s internal watchdog, the Office of Inspector General, took resident’s comments Wednesday night. 

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