HIV

A new state program will deliver medically tailored meals to people with HIV in Indiana. The Ryan’s Meals for Life project is funded by a $1 million grant from the Indiana State Department of Health. 

Charlotte Tuggle / WBAA

Tippecanoe County Health Department officials report a 93-percent syringe return rate among recurring participants during the first six months of the county’s needle exchange program.

A total of 138 people – most between the ages of 30 and 40 – have participated. The department has distributed about 11,000 needles in that time.

County Health Officer Jeremy Adler says the department has also focused on connecting participants with resources including substance abuse treatment, mental health services and Hepatitis C and HIV testing.

Viral Maps Show Exactly How An HIV Outbreak Spread

Jan 24, 2018

Epidemiologists traditionally have depended on what people say to discover how disease spreads. But in investigating Indiana's recent HIV outbreak, the CDC tracked what the virus says — by looking at its DNA.

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Wikimedia Commons

One of the first Indiana counties to implement a syringe exchange is now the first in the state to effectively shut its program down.

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Governor Tom Wolf/FLICKR / https://www.flickr.com/photos/governortomwolf/

Medicaid spending on three important medications used to treat opioid addiction increased 136 percent nationwide between 2011 and 2016, according to a new report from the Urban Institute, a public policy think tank based in Washington D.C. The increases were much higher in some states—in seven states, rates rose more than 400 percent.

Steve Burns/Indiana Public Broadcasting

The small town of Austin, Indiana, made national headlines for an HIV outbreak tied to injection drug use two years ago.

Now, community in Scott County is making news for a different reason.

For the first time ever, the high school’s Dimensions show choir is heading to a national competition in Chicago later this month.

Gretchen Frazee, Indiana Public Media

An increase in the number of hepatitis C infections attributable to injection drug use has prompted Tippecanoe County Health Officer Jeremy Adler to start developing a plan to stem the spread of the virus.

County data show 61 percent of new hepatitis C cases last year occurred in people who had injected drugs, an increase from 50 percent in 2014, and 37 percent in 2013.

Wheeler Cowperthwaite / https://www.flickr.com/photos/wcowperthwaite/

Across multiple age categories, the rate of HIV infection in Indiana has remained relatively stable for the last five years of data available. However, an increasing number of Hoosiers in their twenties are contracting the virus.

The number of newly-diagnosed, HIV-positive Hoosiers in their twenties saw a nearly 40-percent increase between the years 2010 and 2014, the year in which the most recent data was available. That’s even as the second-most diagnosed group – 30-something Hoosiers – saw an 11-percent decline in the number of new HIV cases in the same period.

NIAID / https://www.flickr.com/photos/niaid/6813403685

The Indiana State Department of Health says they’ve diagnosed four new cases of HIV linked to the Scott County outbreak.

That brings the total number of people infected up to 188.

The Indiana State Department of Health says all of the new cases involve people who were identified as contacts of others previously diagnosed with HIV.

The majority of the cases associated with the outbreak have been linked to intravenous drug use.

State Epidemiologist Pam Pontones says those at risk for HIV should be retested every three months.

HIV Outbreak Likely To Cost Millions In Medical Treatment

Dec 21, 2015
Gretchen Frazee / IPBS

One health expert predicts the lifetime cost of treatment for those impacted by Indiana’s HIV outbreak could reach $58 million.

Since the outbreak began last year, the state health department says 184 people have been diagnosed with HIV.

Co-Director of the Rural Center for AIDS and STD Prevention Beth Meyerson says the lifetime medical costs for a person with HIV run between $230,000 and $350,000.

“This is non-medication related costs or chronic disease medication,” she says.

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